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3600+ Nouns That Start With E

    Nouns That Start With E

    Nouns are some of the most basic words in any language, and they are essential for communication. Nouns that start with E are especially common, as they are among the most frequently used words in the English language. Here are some of the most common nouns that start with E, along with a brief definition of each. Nouns that start with E are not always easy to categorize, but this list should give you a good starting point.

    Nouns That Start With The Letter E

    Contents

    If you’re looking for a list of nouns that start with the letter E, you’ve come to the right place. Here you’ll find a variety of common and uncommon nouns starting with E, all of which are organized by type.

    Whether you’re looking for a noun to use in a sentence or just want to expand your vocabulary, this list is sure to be helpful.

    Nouns That Start With E

    Common nouns that start with E include:

    earth, egg, electricity, email, employee, end, energy, entertainment, envelope, error, event.

    Uncommon nouns that start with E include:

    eagerness, earl, earring, earthquake, echo, eclipse, economy, edge, editor, eel, effort, eggplant, eight, elbow, elephant, elevator, ellipse, emotion, emperor ,employer ,encyclopedia, endangered species, enemy, engine, enthusiasm, entrance, envy, epidemic, equation, equipment, error, escape, essay, estate, estimate, ethics, Europe.

    Even if you don’t find the perfect noun on this list, hopefully you’re inspired to keep brainstorming. There are endless possibilities when it comes to words that start with E.

    126 Nouns That Start With EA

    EastertideThe Easter period.
    eager(of a person) wanting to do or have something very much.
    eagernessEnthusiasm to do or to have something; keenness.
    eagleA large bird of prey with a massive hooked bill and long broad wings, renowned for its keen sight and powerful soaring flight. Golf US Play (a hole) in two strokes under par.
    eagle-hawkAustralian Any of various birds of prey; especially any of the hawk eagles (genus Spizaetus and related genera). Now chiefly historical.
    eaglesA large bird of prey with a massive hooked bill and long broad wings, renowned for its keen sight and powerful soaring flight. Golf US Play (a hole) in two strokes under par.
    eagletA young eagle.
    eagletsA young eagle.
    eagrea tidal flood or flow
    ealdormanIn Anglo-Saxon England
    earThe organ of hearing and balance in humans and other vertebrates, especially the external part of this. The seed-bearing head or spike of a cereal plant.
    earachePain inside the ear.
    earachesPain inside the ear.
    earbashTalk to (someone) at length, often in a reproachful manner.
    earbashesTalk to (someone) at length, often in a reproachful manner.
    eardrumThe membrane of the middle ear, which vibrates in response to sound waves; the tympanic membrane.
    eardrumsThe membrane of the middle ear, which vibrates in response to sound waves; the tympanic membrane.
    earflapA flap of material on a hat or cap, covering the ear.
    earflapsA flap of material on a hat or cap, covering the ear.
    earfulinformal
    earfulsinformal
    earingThe action of ploughing; (also) an instance of this, a ploughing. The coming into ear of a cereal crop. In earlier use
    earingsThe action of ploughing; (also) an instance of this, a ploughing. The coming into ear of a cereal crop. In earlier use
    earlA British nobleman ranking above a viscount and below a marquess.
    earldomThe rank or title of an earl.
    earldomsThe rank or title of an earl.
    earlobeThe soft, fleshy lower part of the external ear.
    earlobesThe soft, fleshy lower part of the external ear.
    earlsA British nobleman ranking above a viscount and below a marquess.
    earmarkDesignate (something, typically funds or resources) for a particular purpose. Mark the ear of (an animal) as a sign of ownership or identity. A characteristic or identifying feature. US A mark on the ear of a domesticated animal indicating ownership or identity.
    earmarksDesignate (something, typically funds or resources) for a particular purpose. Mark the ear of (an animal) as a sign of ownership or identity. A characteristic or identifying feature. US A mark on the ear of a domesticated animal indicating ownership or identity.
    earmuffsA pair of soft fabric coverings, connected by a band across the top of the head, that are worn over the ears to protect them from cold or noise.
    earnerA person who obtains money in return for labor or services.
    earnersA person who obtains money in return for labor or services.
    earnestResulting from or showing sincere and intense conviction. A thing intended or regarded as a sign or promise of what is to come.
    earningObtain (money) in return for labor or services.
    earningsMoney obtained in return for labor or services.
    earphoneAn electrical device worn on the ear to receive radio or telephone communications or to listen to a radio, MP3 player, etc. , without other people hearing.
    earphonesAn electrical device worn on the ear to receive radio or telephone communications or to listen to a radio, MP3 player, etc. , without other people hearing.
    earpieceThe part of a phone, radio receiver, or other aural device that is applied to the ear during use. The part of a pair of glasses that fits around the ear.
    earpiecesThe part of a phone, radio receiver, or other aural device that is applied to the ear during use. The part of a pair of glasses that fits around the ear.
    earplugA piece of wax, rubber, or cotton placed in the ear as protection against noise or water. historical
    earplugsA piece of wax, rubber, or cotton placed in the ear as protection against noise or water. historical
    earringA piece of jewelry worn on the lobe or edge of the ear.
    earringsA piece of jewelry worn on the lobe or edge of the ear.
    earsThe organ of hearing and balance in humans and other vertebrates, especially the external part of this. The seed-bearing head or spike of a cereal plant.
    earthThe substance of the land surface; soil. British The underground den or home of a badger or fox. earth something upHunting British
    earthingThe substance of the land surface; soil. British The underground den or home of a badger or fox. earth something upHunting British
    earthlingAn inhabitant of the earth (used especially in science fiction by members of alien species)
    earthlingsAn inhabitant of the earth (used especially in science fiction by members of alien species)
    earthmanScience Fiction historical
    earthmoverA vehicle or machine designed to excavate large quantities of soil.
    earthmoversA vehicle or machine designed to excavate large quantities of soil.
    earthquakeA sudden and violent shaking of the ground, sometimes causing great destruction, as a result of movements within the earth’s crust or volcanic action.
    earthquakesA sudden and violent shaking of the ground, sometimes causing great destruction, as a result of movements within the earth’s crust or volcanic action.
    earthriserare The rise of earth above the horizon, as seen by an observer on (or in orbit around) another planet; an instance of this.
    earthsThe substance of the land surface; soil. British The underground den or home of a badger or fox. earth something upHunting British
    earthworkA large artificial bank of soil, especially one used as a fortification.
    earthworksA large artificial bank of soil, especially one used as a fortification.
    earthwormA burrowing annelid worm that lives in the soil. Earthworms play an important role in aerating and draining the soil and in burying organic matter.
    earthwormsA burrowing annelid worm that lives in the soil. Earthworms play an important role in aerating and draining the soil and in burying organic matter.
    earwaxThe protective yellow waxy substance secreted in the passage of the outer ear.
    earwigA small elongated insect with a pair of terminal appendages that resemble pincers. The females typically care for their eggs and young until they are grown. British
    earwigsA small elongated insect with a pair of terminal appendages that resemble pincers. The females typically care for their eggs and young until they are grown. British
    easeAbsence of difficulty or effort. with objectno object, with adverbial of direction
    easelA self-supporting wooden frame for holding an artist’s work while it is being painted or drawn.
    easelsA self-supporting wooden frame for holding an artist’s work while it is being painted or drawn.
    easementLaw literary
    easesAbsence of difficulty or effort. with objectno object, with adverbial of direction
    easingAbsence of difficulty or effort. with objectno object, with adverbial of direction
    eastThe direction toward the point of the horizon where the sun rises at the equinoxes, on the right-hand side of a person facing north, or the point on the horizon itself. The eastern part of the world or of a specified country, region, or town. EastLying toward, near, or facing the east. often EastTo or toward the east.
    easterThe most important and oldest festival of the Christian Church, celebrating the resurrection of Jesus Christ and held (in the Western Church) between March 21 and April 25, on the first Sunday after the first full moon following the northern spring equinox.
    easterliesLying or moving in an eastward position or direction. In or towards an eastward position or direction. A wind blowing from the east.
    easterlinghistorical historical, archaic British
    easterlingshistorical historical, archaic British
    easterlyLying or moving in an eastward position or direction. In or towards an eastward position or direction. A wind blowing from the east.
    easternerA native or inhabitant of the east, especially of the eastern US.
    easternersA native or inhabitant of the east, especially of the eastern US.
    eastingDistance traveled or measured eastward, especially at sea.
    eastingsDistance traveled or measured eastward, especially at sea.
    eastwardIn an easterly direction. Toward the east. The direction or region toward the east.
    eastwardsIn an easterly direction. Toward the east. The direction or region toward the east.
    eatableFit to be consumed as food. Items of food.
    eatablesFit to be consumed as food. Items of food.
    eaterA person or animal that consumes food in a specified way or of a specified kind.
    eateriesA restaurant or other place where people can be served food.
    eatersA person or animal that consumes food in a specified way or of a specified kind.
    eateryA restaurant or other place where people can be served food.
    eatingPut (food) into the mouth and chew and swallow it. mainly US eats
    eatsPut (food) into the mouth and chew and swallow it. mainly US eats
    eauAmerican Football Delaware (in official postal use).
    eavesThe part of a roof that meets or overhangs the walls of a building.
    EalingEarhartEarp
    EarthaEastbourneEastleigh
    Eastmaneaglewoodeaglewoods
    eagreseanlingear-shell
    earbobearbobseardrop
    eardropsearlapearlaps
    earlinessearmuffearnestness
    earth-closetearth-closetsearthenware
    earthinessearthlinesseasiness
    eastseatageeath
    eatingseauseavesdropper
    eavesdroppers

    20 Nouns Starting With EB

    EboracumAlvin Cullum 1887–1964 American soldiercity on the Ouse River in North Yorkshire, northern England population153000city in southeastern Pennsylvania southeast of Harrisburg population43718municipality in southeastern Ontario, Canada population892712
    EbroA river in northeastern Spain that rises in the mountains of the Cantabria region and flows southeast for 570 miles (910 km) into the Mediterranean Sea.
    ebbThe movement of the tide out to sea. (of tidewater) move away from the land; recede. (of an emotion or quality) gradually lessen or reduce.
    ebbingThe movement of the tide out to sea. (of tidewater) move away from the land; recede. (of an emotion or quality) gradually lessen or reduce.
    ebbsThe movement of the tide out to sea. (of tidewater) move away from the land; recede. (of an emotion or quality) gradually lessen or reduce.
    ebonDark brown or black; ebony.
    eboniesHeavy blackish or very dark brown timber from a mainly tropical tree. A tree of tropical and warm-temperate regions which produces ebony.
    ebonitehard rubber especially when black
    ebonyHeavy blackish or very dark brown timber from a mainly tropical tree. A tree of tropical and warm-temperate regions which produces ebony.
    ebullienceThe quality of being cheerful and full of energy; exuberance.
    ebulliencesthe quality of lively or enthusiastic expression of thoughts or feelings
    ebullioscopyebulliometry
    ebullitiontechnical, archaic
    ebullitionstechnical, archaic
    eburnationa diseased condition in which bone or cartilage is eburnated
    eburnationsa diseased condition in which bone or cartilage is eburnated
    Eblisebonistebonists
    ebons

    140 Words That Start With EC Nouns

    EcclesEcclesiastes (in biblical references).
    EchinoideaA class of echinoderms that comprises the sea urchins.
    EcuadorA republic in northwestern South America, on the Pacific coast; population 16,100,000 (estimated 2015); capital, Quito; languages, Spanish (official), Quechua.
    EcuadorianRelating to Ecuador or its people. A native or inhabitant of Ecuador.
    ecadAn organism that is modified by its environment.
    ecadsAn organism that is modified by its environment.
    ecbolicInducing contractions of the uterus leading to expulsion of a fetus. An agent that induces contractions of the uterus.
    ecbolicsInducing contractions of the uterus leading to expulsion of a fetus. An agent that induces contractions of the uterus.
    eccentric(of a person or their behavior) unconventional and slightly strange. technical A person of unconventional and slightly strange views or behavior. A disc or wheel mounted eccentrically on a revolving shaft in order to transform rotation into backward-and-forward motion, e. g. a cam in an internal combustion engine.
    ecclesiasticsecclesiastical
    ecdysiastA striptease performer.
    ecdysisThe process of shedding the old skin (in reptiles) or casting off the outer cuticle (in insects and other arthropods).
    echelonA level or rank in an organization, a profession, or society. Military Arrange in an echelon formation.
    echelonsA level or rank in an organization, a profession, or society. Military Arrange in an echelon formation.
    echeveriaA succulent plant with rosettes of fleshy colorful leaves, native to warm regions of America and popular as houseplants.
    echidnaA spiny insectivorous egg-laying mammal with a long snout and claws, native to Australia and New Guinea.
    echidnasA spiny insectivorous egg-laying mammal with a long snout and claws, native to Australia and New Guinea.
    echinoidAn echinoderm of the class Echinoidea; a sea urchin. Relating to or denoting echinoids.
    echinoidsAn echinoderm of the class Echinoidea; a sea urchin. Relating to or denoting echinoids.
    echinusZoology Architecture
    echinusesZoology Architecture
    echoA sound or series of sounds caused by the reflection of sound waves from a surface back to the listener. A close parallel or repetition of an idea, feeling, style, or event. archaic A code word representing the letter E, used in radio communication. Bridge (of a sound) be repeated or reverberate after the original sound has stopped. with objectComputing Bridge A nymph deprived of speech by Hera in order to stop her chatter, and left able only to repeat what others had said.
    echoesA sound or series of sounds caused by the reflection of sound waves from a surface back to the listener. A close parallel or repetition of an idea, feeling, style, or event. archaic A code word representing the letter E, used in radio communication. Bridge (of a sound) be repeated or reverberate after the original sound has stopped. with objectComputing Bridge A nymph deprived of speech by Hera in order to stop her chatter, and left able only to repeat what others had said.
    echogramA recording of depth or distance under water made by an echo sounder.
    echogramsA recording of depth or distance under water made by an echo sounder.
    echolaliaPsychiatry Repetition of speech by a child learning to talk.
    echovirusAny of a group of enteroviruses that can cause a range of diseases, including respiratory infections and a mild form of meningitis.
    eclampsiaA condition in which one or more convulsions occur in a pregnant woman suffering from high blood pressure, often followed by coma and posing a threat to the health of mother and baby.
    eclecticDeriving ideas, style, or taste from a broad and diverse range of sources. A person who derives ideas, style, or taste from a broad and diverse range of sources.
    eclecticsDeriving ideas, style, or taste from a broad and diverse range of sources. A person who derives ideas, style, or taste from a broad and diverse range of sources.
    eclipseAn obscuring of the light from one celestial body by the passage of another between it and the observer or between it and its source of illumination. Ornithology (of a celestial body) obscure the light from or to (another celestial body)
    eclipsesAn obscuring of the light from one celestial body by the passage of another between it and the observer or between it and its source of illumination. Ornithology (of a celestial body) obscure the light from or to (another celestial body)
    eclipticA great circle on the celestial sphere representing the sun’s apparent path during the year, so called because lunar and solar eclipses can occur only when the moon crosses it. Of an eclipse or the ecliptic.
    eclipticsA great circle on the celestial sphere representing the sun’s apparent path during the year, so called because lunar and solar eclipses can occur only when the moon crosses it. Of an eclipse or the ecliptic.
    eclogiteA metamorphic rock containing granular minerals, typically garnet and pyroxene.
    eclogueA short poem, especially a pastoral dialogue.
    ecloguesA short poem, especially a pastoral dialogue.
    ecocideDestruction of the natural environment by deliberate or negligent human action.
    ecologistAn expert in or student of ecology.
    ecologistsa branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their environments
    ecologyThe branch of biology that deals with the relations of organisms to one another and to their physical surroundings.
    economicsThe branch of knowledge concerned with the production, consumption, and transfer of wealth. The condition of a region or group as regards material prosperity.
    economiesThe wealth and resources of a country or region, especially in terms of the production and consumption of goods and services. Careful management of available resources. (of a product) offering the best value for the money.
    economistAn expert in economics.
    economyThe wealth and resources of a country or region, especially in terms of the production and consumption of goods and services. Careful management of available resources. (of a product) offering the best value for the money.
    ecosphereThe biosphere of the earth or another planet, especially when the interaction between the living and nonliving components is emphasized.
    ecosystemEcology
    ecotypeA distinct form or race of a plant or animal species occupying a particular habitat.
    ecotypesA distinct form or race of a plant or animal species occupying a particular habitat.
    ecruThe light beige color of unbleached linen.
    ecstasiesAn overwhelming feeling of great happiness or joyful excitement. An emotional or religious frenzy or trance-like state, originally one involving an experience of mystic self-transcendence.
    ecstasyAn overwhelming feeling of great happiness or joyful excitement. An emotional or religious frenzy or trance-like state, originally one involving an experience of mystic self-transcendence.
    ecstaticFeeling or expressing overwhelming happiness or joyful excitement. Involving an experience of mystic self-transcendence. A person subject to mystical experiences.
    ectodermThe outermost layer of cells or tissue of an embryo in early development, or the parts derived from this, which include the epidermis and nerve tissue.
    ectomorphA person with a lean and delicate body build.
    ectoplasmBiology A supernatural viscous substance that is supposed to exude from the body of a medium during a spiritualistic trance and form the material for the manifestation of spirits.
    ectropionA condition, typically a consequence of advanced age, in which the eyelid is turned outward away from the eyeball.
    ecuThe former official monetary unit of the European Union, used to evaluate the exchange rates and reserves of members of the European Monetary System on a common basis and in trading Eurobonds. It was replaced by the euro.
    ecumenismThe principle or aim of promoting unity among the world’s Christian Churches.
    ecusThe former official monetary unit of the European Union, used to evaluate the exchange rates and reserves of members of the European Monetary System on a common basis and in trading Eurobonds. It was replaced by the euro.
    eczemaA medical condition in which patches of skin become rough and inflamed, with blisters that cause itching and bleeding, sometimes resulting from a reaction to irritation (eczematous dermatitis) but more typically having no obvious external cause.
    EcclesiastesEcclesiasticusEchinodermata
    EckhardtEcuadoranEcuadorans
    Ecuadorianseccentricitieseccentricity
    ecclesiaecclesiarchecclesiarchs
    ecclesiasecclesiasticecclesiasticism
    ecclesiolaterecclesiolatersecclesiolatry
    ecclesiologistecclesiologistsecclesiology
    eccrinologyechinococcusechinoderms
    echoerechoersechoism
    echolocationechoviruseseclecticism
    eclosionecocideseconometrician
    econometricianseconometricseconometrist
    econometristseconomiserseconomizer
    economizersecospeciesecospheres
    ecosystemsecphonesisectasis
    ecthlipsisecthymaectoblast
    ectoblastsectocrineectocrines
    ectoenzymeectogenesisectomorphs
    ectomorphyectoparasiteectoparasites
    ectophyteectophytesectopia
    ectoplasmsectosarcectosarcs
    ectozoaectozoanectozoon
    ectropionsectypeectypes
    ecumenicalismecumenicismecumenics

    86 Nouns Beginning With ED

    EdamA town in the Netherlands, to the northeast of Amsterdam; population 28,448 (2008) (with Volendam). A round Dutch cheese, typically pale yellow with a red wax coating.
    EddaEither of two 13th-century Icelandic books, the Elder or Poetic Edda (a collection of Old Norse poems on Norse legends) and the Younger or Prose Edda (a handbook to Icelandic poetry by Snorri Sturluson). The Eddas are the chief source of knowledge of Scandinavian mythology.
    EddingtonSir Arthur Stanley 1882–1944 English astronomer
    Eddystonefourth in a series of lighthouses dating back to 1699 and constructed on
    EdenThe place where Adam and Eve lived in the biblical account of the Creation, from which they were expelled for disobediently eating the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. A place or state of great happiness; an unspoiled paradise.
    Edgar(944–75), king of England 959–975; younger brother of Edwy. He became king of Northumbria and Mercia in 957 when these regions renounced their allegiance to Edwy. He succeeded to the throne of England on Edwy’s death.
    EdinburghThe capital of Scotland, on the southern shore of the Firth of Forth; population 449,100 (est. 2009). The city grew up around the 11th-century castle built by Malcolm III on a rocky ridge that dominates the landscape.
    EdisonA township in eastern New Jersey, northeast of New Brunswick; population 99,706 (est. 2008). It is home to Thomas Edison’s research laboratory in Menlo Park.
    Edithmountain 11,033 feet (3363 meters) high in Jasper National Park, southwestern Alberta, Canada
    EdmontonThe capital of the province of Alberta, in western Canada, on the North Saskatchewan River; population 730,372 (2006).
    EdmundThe name of two kings of England.
    Edomancient country in southwestern Asia south of Judea and the Dead Sea
    EdomiteA member of an ancient people living in Edom, a region south of the Dead Sea, in biblical times, traditionally believed to be descended from Esau.
    Edomitesa member of a Semitic people living south of the Dead Sea in biblical times
    EdwardThe name of six kings of England and also one of Great Britain and Ireland and one of the United Kingdom.
    Edwin585?–633 king of Northumbria (616–633)
    edacityof or relating to eating
    eddiesA circular movement of water, counter to a main current, causing a small whirlpool. (of water, air, or smoke) move in a circular way.
    eddoA taro corm or plant of a West Indian variety with many edible cormlets.
    eddoesA taro corm or plant of a West Indian variety with many edible cormlets.
    eddyA circular movement of water, counter to a main current, causing a small whirlpool. (of water, air, or smoke) move in a circular way.
    edelweissA European mountain plant that has woolly white bracts around its small flowers and downy gray-green leaves.
    edelweissesA European mountain plant that has woolly white bracts around its small flowers and downy gray-green leaves.
    edemaA condition characterized by an excess of watery fluid collecting in the cavities or tissues of the body.
    edemasan abnormal infiltration and excess accumulation of serous fluid in connective tissue or in a serous cavity
    edentateA mammal of an order distinguished by the lack of incisor and canine teeth. The edentates, which include anteaters, sloths, and armadillos, are all native to Central and South America.
    edgeThe outside limit of an object, area, or surface; a place or part farthest away from the center of something. The sharpened side of the blade of a cutting implement or weapon. A quality or factor that gives superiority over close rivals or competitors. with objectMove gradually, carefully, or furtively in a particular direction. with objectno object
    edgerone that edges
    edgersone that edges
    edgesThe outside limit of an object, area, or surface; a place or part farthest away from the center of something. The sharpened side of the blade of a cutting implement or weapon. A quality or factor that gives superiority over close rivals or competitors. with objectMove gradually, carefully, or furtively in a particular direction. with objectno object
    edginesshaving an edge
    edgingSomething forming an edge or border.
    edgingsSomething forming an edge or border.
    edhAn Old English letter, ð or Ð, representing the dental fricatives /θ/ and /ð/. It was superseded by the digraph th, but is now used as a phonetic symbol for the voiced dental fricative /ð/.
    edibilityfit to be eaten
    edibleFit or suitable to be eaten. edibles
    ediblenessfit to be eaten
    ediblesFit or suitable to be eaten. edibles
    edictAn official order or proclamation issued by a person in authority.
    edictsAn official order or proclamation issued by a person in authority.
    edificationThe instruction or improvement of a person morally or intellectually.
    edificeA building, especially a large, imposing one. A complex system of beliefs.
    edificesA building, especially a large, imposing one. A complex system of beliefs.
    edifierone that edifies
    editPrepare (written material) for publication by correcting, condensing, or otherwise modifying it. Be editor of (a newspaper or magazine)Genetics A change or correction made as a result of editing.
    editingPrepare (written material) for publication by correcting, condensing, or otherwise modifying it. Be editor of (a newspaper or magazine)Genetics A change or correction made as a result of editing.
    editionA particular form or version of a published text. The total number of copies of a book, newspaper, or other published material issued at one time. A particular version or instance of a regular program or broadcast.
    editionsA particular form or version of a published text. The total number of copies of a book, newspaper, or other published material issued at one time. A particular version or instance of a regular program or broadcast.
    editorA person who is in charge of and determines the final content of a text, particularly a newspaper or magazine. A computer program enabling the user to enter or alter text.
    editorialRelating to the commissioning or preparing of material for publication. A newspaper article written by or on behalf of an editor that gives an opinion on a topical issue.
    editorializationThe action or an act of introducing editorial comments or expressing an opinion about something, rather than simply reporting the news or giving the facts.
    editorialsRelating to the commissioning or preparing of material for publication. A newspaper article written by or on behalf of an editor that gives an opinion on a topical issue.
    editorsA person who is in charge of and determines the final content of a text, particularly a newspaper or magazine. A computer program enabling the user to enter or alter text.
    editorshipThe position of editor in charge of a newspaper, magazine, or multiauthor book.
    editorshipsThe position of editor in charge of a newspaper, magazine, or multiauthor book.
    editressa woman who is an editor
    editressesa woman who is an editor
    editsPrepare (written material) for publication by correcting, condensing, or otherwise modifying it. Be editor of (a newspaper or magazine)Genetics A change or correction made as a result of editing.
    educationThe process of receiving or giving systematic instruction, especially at a school or university. an education
    educationsThe process of receiving or giving systematic instruction, especially at a school or university. an education
    educatorA person who provides instruction or education; a teacher.
    educatorsA person who provides instruction or education; a teacher.
    eductChemistry That which is inferred or elicited from something; a product or result of inference or development. Educe.
    eductionto bring out (something, such as something latent)
    eductionsto bring out (something, such as something latent)
    eductorA person who or thing which educes or elicits something. Engineering
    eductorsA person who or thing which educes or elicits something. Engineering
    eductsChemistry That which is inferred or elicited from something; a product or result of inference or development. Educe.
    EddieEdgehillEdie
    EdnaEdwardianismEdwina
    edgeboneedgebonesedifiers
    edileedileseducatability
    educationalisteducationalistseducationists

    9 Nouns That Start With EE

    eelA snake-like fish with a slender elongated body and poorly developed fins, proverbial for its slipperiness.
    eelgrassA marine plant with long ribbon-like leaves that grows in coastal waters and brackish inlets. North American
    eelgrassesa submerged long-leaved monocotyledonous marine plant (Zostera marina) that is found especially in coastal temperate waters and whose dried stems and leaves are used especially as packing material in woven goods
    eelpoutA fish of cool or cold seas, having a broad head with thick lips and an elongated body with the dorsal and anal fins continuous with the tail.
    eelpoutsA fish of cool or cold seas, having a broad head with thick lips and an elongated body with the dorsal and anal fins continuous with the tail.
    eelsA snake-like fish with a slender elongated body and poorly developed fins, proverbial for its slipperiness.
    eelwormA nematode, especially a small soil nematode that can become a serious pest of crops and ornamental plants.
    eelwormsA nematode, especially a small soil nematode that can become a serious pest of crops and ornamental plants.
    eerinessso mysterious, strange, or unexpected as to send a chill up the spine

    55 Nouns Starting With EF

    EfikA member of a people of southern Nigeria. The Benue-Congo language of the Efik, closely related to Ibibio, and used as a lingua franca. Relating to the Efik or their language.
    effacementthe act or process of effacing or eliminating something
    effacementsto eliminate or make indistinct by or as if by wearing away a surface
    effectA change which is a result or consequence of an action or other cause. effectseffectsCause (something) to happen; bring about.
    effecterA person who or thing which brings about an event or result, accomplishes a purpose, etc. Usually with of.
    effectersA person who or thing which brings about an event or result, accomplishes a purpose, etc. Usually with of.
    effectivenessThe degree to which something is successful in producing a desired result; success.
    effectorAn organ or cell that acts in response to a stimulus.
    effectorsAn organ or cell that acts in response to a stimulus.
    effectsA change which is a result or consequence of an action or other cause. effectseffectsCause (something) to happen; bring about.
    effeminacyThe quality in a man of having characteristics and ways of behaving traditionally associated with women and regarded as inappropriate for a man.
    effendiA man of high education or social standing in an eastern Mediterranean or Arab country.
    effendisA man of high education or social standing in an eastern Mediterranean or Arab country.
    effervescenceBubbles in a liquid; fizz. Vivacity and enthusiasm.
    effetenessno longer fertile
    efficacyThe ability to produce a desired or intended result.
    efficienciesThe state or quality of being efficient.
    efficiencyThe state or quality of being efficient.
    effigiesA sculpture or model of a person.
    effigyA sculpture or model of a person.
    effleurageA form of massage involving a circular stroking movement made with the palm of the hand. Massage with a circular stroking movement.
    effleuragesA form of massage involving a circular stroking movement made with the palm of the hand. Massage with a circular stroking movement.
    efflorescenceThe formation of a powdery deposit on the surface of brickwork, rock, or other material as a result of loss of moisture on exposure to air. Rapid growth or development.
    effluenceA substance that flows out from something.
    effluencessomething that flows out
    effluentLiquid waste or sewage discharged into a river or the sea.
    effluentsLiquid waste or sewage discharged into a river or the sea.
    effluviumAn unpleasant or harmful odor, secretion, or discharge.
    effluviumsan invisible emanation
    effluxtechnical
    effluxessomething given off in or as if in a stream
    effortA vigorous or determined attempt. technical
    effortsA vigorous or determined attempt. technical
    effronteriesInsolent or impertinent behavior.
    effronteryInsolent or impertinent behavior.
    effulgenceradiant splendor
    effulgencesradiant splendor
    effusiometeran apparatus for determining the effusion velocities of gases and hence their densities
    effusionAn instance of giving off something such as a liquid, light, or smell.
    effusionsAn instance of giving off something such as a liquid, light, or smell.
    eftdialect
    eftsElectronic funds transfer system.
    effeminatenesseffervescencieseffervescency
    efficaciousnesseffortlessnesseffusiometers

    57 Words That Start With EG Nouns

    Egbert(died 839), king of Wessex 802–39. In 825 he won a decisive victory that temporarily brought Mercian supremacy to an end and foreshadowed the supremacy that Wessex later secured over all England.
    EgyptA country in northeastern Africa, on the Mediterranean Sea; population 91,500,000 (estimated 2015); capital, Cairo; official language, Arabic.
    EgyptianRelating to Egypt or its people. A native of ancient or modern Egypt, or a person of Egyptian descent. The Afro-Asiatic language used in ancient Egypt, attested from c. 3000 BC. It is represented in its oldest stages by hieroglyphic inscriptions and in its latest form by Coptic; it has been replaced in modern use by Arabic.
    EgyptologyThe study of the language, history, and civilization of ancient Egypt.
    eggAn oval or round object laid by a female bird, reptile, fish, or invertebrate, usually containing a developing embryo. The eggs of birds are enclosed in a chalky shell, while those of reptiles are in a leathery membrane. Biology informal, dated Urge or encourage someone to do something, especially something foolish or risky.
    eggarA large brownish moth that is often active during the day. The caterpillars typically bear irritant hairs and make an egg-shaped cocoon.
    eggarsA large brownish moth that is often active during the day. The caterpillars typically bear irritant hairs and make an egg-shaped cocoon.
    eggcupA small cup for holding a boiled egg upright while it is being eaten.
    eggcupsA small cup for holding a boiled egg upright while it is being eaten.
    eggheadA person who is highly academic or studious; an intellectual.
    eggheadsA person who is highly academic or studious; an intellectual.
    eggnogA drink made from a mixture of beaten eggs, cream, and flavorings, often with alcohol.
    eggnogsA drink made from a mixture of beaten eggs, cream, and flavorings, often with alcohol.
    eggsAn oval or round object laid by a female bird, reptile, fish, or invertebrate, usually containing a developing embryo. The eggs of birds are enclosed in a chalky shell, while those of reptiles are in a leathery membrane. Biology informal, dated Urge or encourage someone to do something, especially something foolish or risky.
    eggshellThe thin, hard outer layer of an egg, especially a hen’s egg.
    egisa shield or breastplate emblematic of majesty that was associated with Zeus and Athena
    egoA person’s sense of self-esteem or self-importance.
    egomaniaObsessive egotism or self-centeredness.
    egomaniacA person who is obsessively egotistical or self-centered.
    egosA person’s sense of self-esteem or self-importance.
    egotismThe practice of talking and thinking about oneself excessively because of an undue sense of self-importance.
    egotistA person who is excessively conceited or self-absorbed; a self-seeker.
    egotistsA person who is excessively conceited or self-absorbed; a self-seeker.
    egressThe action of going out of or leaving a place. Go out of or leave (a place)
    egretA heron with mainly white plumage, having long plumes in the breeding season.
    egretsA heron with mainly white plumage, having long plumes in the breeding season.
    EghamEgonEgyptologist
    egg-and-anchoregg-and-tongueeglantines
    egocentricitiesegocentricityegocentrism
    egregiousnessegressionegressions

    Nouns Beginning With EH

    EhrlichPaul 1854–1915 German bacteriologistPaul Ralph 1932– American biologist

    47 Nouns That Start With EI

    EiffelAlexandre-Gustave 1832–1923 French engineer
    Eigermountain 13,025 feet (3970 meters) high in west central Switzerland northeast of the Jungfrau
    EilatThe southernmost town in Israel, a port and resort at the head of the Gulf of Aqaba; population 46,600 (est. 2008). Founded in 1949 near the ruins of biblical Elath, it is Israel’s only outlet to the Red Sea.
    EindhovenA city in the southern Netherlands; population 210,333 (2008).
    Einsteinthe radiant energy of a given frequency required to effect the complete photochemical transformation of one mole of a photosensitive substance being equal to about 0. 004 erg second times the frequency in questionAlbert 1879–1955 American (German-born) physicist
    EireThe Gaelic name for Ireland, and the Irish name of the Republic of Ireland.
    EisenhowerDwight David 1890–1969 American general; 34th president of the U. S. (1953–61)
    EisensteinSergey Mikhaylovich 1898–1948 Soviet (Russian-born) film director
    eiderA northern sea duck, of which the male has mainly black and white plumage with a colored head, and the brown female has soft down feathers that are used to line the nest.
    eiderdownSmall, soft feathers from the breast of the female eider duck.
    eiderdownsSmall, soft feathers from the breast of the female eider duck.
    eidersA northern sea duck, of which the male has mainly black and white plumage with a colored head, and the brown female has soft down feathers that are used to line the nest.
    eidolonAn idealized person or thing. A specter or phantom.
    eigenfunctionEach of a set of independent functions which are the solutions to a given differential equation.
    eigenvalueEach of a set of values of a parameter for which a differential equation has a nonzero solution (an eigenfunction) under given conditions. Any number such that a given matrix minus that number times the identity matrix has zero determinant.
    eigenvaluesEach of a set of values of a parameter for which a differential equation has a nonzero solution (an eigenfunction) under given conditions. Any number such that a given matrix minus that number times the identity matrix has zero determinant.
    eighta number that is one more than seven — see Table of Numbers
    eighteena number that is one more than seventeen — see Table of Numbers
    eighteenmothe size (approximately 4 by 6. 5 inches) of a piece of paper cut 18 from a sheet
    eighteensa number that is one more than seventeen — see Table of Numbers
    eighteenthConstituting number eighteen in a sequence; 18th. Each of eighteen equal parts into which something is or may be divided.
    eighteenthsConstituting number eighteen in a sequence; 18th. Each of eighteen equal parts into which something is or may be divided.
    eighthConstituting number eight in a sequence; 8th.
    eighthsConstituting number eight in a sequence; 8th.
    eightiesa number that is equal to eight times 10 — see Table of Numbers
    eightiethConstituting number eighty in a sequence; 80th. Each of eighty equal parts into which something is or may be divided.
    eightiethsConstituting number eighty in a sequence; 80th. Each of eighty equal parts into which something is or may be divided.
    eightsa number that is one more than seven — see Table of Numbers
    eightsomea Scottish reel for eight dancers
    eightsomesa Scottish reel for eight dancers
    eightya number that is equal to eight times 10 — see Table of Numbers
    eikonsee icon
    eildbarren
    einkornAn old kind of Mediterranean wheat with small bearded ears and spikelets that each contain one slender grain, used as fodder in prehistoric times but now rarely grown.
    einsteiniumThe chemical element of atomic number 99, a radioactive metal of the actinide series. Einsteinium does not occur naturally and was discovered in 1953 in debris from the first hydrogen bomb explosion.
    eirenicona statement that attempts to harmonize conflicting doctrines (as in a church)
    eireniconsa statement that attempts to harmonize conflicting doctrines (as in a church)
    eisteddfodA competitive festival of music and poetry in Wales, in particular the annual National Eisteddfod.
    eisteddfodsA competitive festival of music and poetry in Wales, in particular the annual National Eisteddfod.
    EileenEisenstadteightpence
    eightpenceseightvoeightvos
    eikons

    11 Nouns Starting With EJ

    ejaculateno object dated Semen that has been ejected from the body.
    ejaculatesno object dated Semen that has been ejected from the body.
    ejaculationThe action of ejecting semen from the body. dated
    ejaculationsThe action of ejecting semen from the body. dated
    ejectionThe action of forcing or throwing something out; emission. The action of forcing someone to leave a place or position; expulsion.
    ejectionsThe action of forcing or throwing something out; emission. The action of forcing someone to leave a place or position; expulsion.
    ejectiveDenoting a type of consonant in some languages (e. g. Hausa) produced by sudden release of pressure from the glottis. An ejective consonant.
    ejectmentLaw
    ejectmentsLaw
    ejectorA device that causes something to be removed or to drop out.
    ejectorsA device that causes something to be removed or to drop out.

    Words That Start With EK Nouns

    ekisticsa science dealing with human settlements and drawing on the research and experience of professionals in various fields (such as architecture, engineering, city planning, and sociology)

    345 Nouns Beginning With EL

    ElamAn ancient state in southwestern Iran, established in the 4th millennium BC. Susa was one of its chief cities.
    ElbaA small island off the western coast of Italy, known as the place of Napoleon’s first exile 1814–15.
    ElbeA river in central Europe that flows for 720 miles (1,159 km) from the Czech Republic through the German cities of Dresden, Magdeburg, and Hamburg to the North Sea.
    ElcheA town in the province of Alicante in southeastern Spain; population 228,348 (2008).
    ElginAn industrial city in northeastern Illinois, west of Chicago, formerly noted for its watch manufacturing; population 106,330 (est. 2008).
    Eli(in the Bible) a priest who acted as a teacher to the prophet Samuel (1 Sam. 1–3).
    EliaThe pseudonym adopted by Charles Lamb in his Essays of Elia (1823) and Last Essays of Elia (1833).
    Elijah(9th century BC), a Hebrew prophet in the time of Jezebel who maintained the worship of Jehovah against that of Baal and other pagan gods.
    Elisha(9th century BC), a Hebrew prophet, disciple and successor of Elijah.
    elandA spiral-horned African antelope that lives in open woodland and grassland. It is the largest of the antelopes.
    elbowThe joint between the forearm and the upper arm. Strike (someone) with one’s elbow. Treat (a person or idea) dismissively.
    eldliterary
    elder(of one or more out of a group of associated people) of a greater age. A person of greater age than someone specified. A small tree or shrub with pithy stems, typically having white flowers and bluish-black or red berries.
    electChoose (someone) to hold public office or some other position by voting. (of a person) chosen or singled out. People who are chosen or singled out.
    elegyA poem of serious reflection, typically a lament for the dead. (in Greek and Roman poetry) a poem written in elegiac couplets, as notably by Catullus and Propertius.
    elemiAn oleoresin obtained from a tropical tree and used in varnishes, ointments, and aromatherapy.
    elfA supernatural creature of folk tales, typically represented as a small, elusive figure in human form with pointed ears, magical powers, and a capricious nature. Extremely low frequency.
    elfin(with reference to a person) small and delicate, typically with an attractively mischievous or strange charm. Relating to elves. archaic A small North American butterfly that is typically brownish with markings on the wing margins that give the impression of scalloped edges.
    elitetreated as singular or pluralA size of letter in typewriting, with 12 characters to the inch (about 4. 7 to the centimeter).
    elkNorth American Elk
    elksNorth American Elk
    ellA former measure of length (equivalent to six hand breadths) used mainly for textiles, locally variable but typically about 45 inches. Something that is L-shaped or that creates an L shape.
    ellsA former measure of length (equivalent to six hand breadths) used mainly for textiles, locally variable but typically about 45 inches. Something that is L-shaped or that creates an L shape.
    elmA tall deciduous tree that typically has rough serrated leaves and propagates from root suckers.
    elmsA tall deciduous tree that typically has rough serrated leaves and propagates from root suckers.
    elul(in the Jewish calendar) the twelfth month of the civil and sixth of the religious year, usually coinciding with parts of August and September.
    elverA young eel, especially when undergoing mass migration upriver from the sea.
    ElaineElamiteElamites
    ElastoplastElastoplastsEldorado
    EleaEleanorEleanore
    EleaticElectraEleusinian
    ElgarEliasElinor
    EliotElisabethEliza
    ElizabethElizabethanElizabethans
    EllaEllenEllie
    EllingtonEllisElma
    ElmoEloElohist
    EloisaEloiseElroy
    ElsaElsanElsie
    ElsinoreElspetElspeth
    EltonElviraElvis
    ElwynElyElysium
    Elzevirelaboratenesselaboration
    elaborationselaboratorelaborators
    elandselasmobranchelasmobranchs
    elastanceelastanceselastic
    elasticityelasticselastin
    elastomerelastomerselatedness
    elaterelaterinelaterite
    elateriumelaterselation
    elativeelativeselbowing
    elbowselderberrieselderberry
    elderlinesselderseldership
    eldershipseldingeldings
    eldselecampaneelecampanes
    electionelectioneerelectioneerer
    electioneererselectioneeringelectioneerings
    electioneerselectionselector
    electorateelectorateselectors
    electresselectresseselectret
    electretselectricelectrician
    electricianselectricityelectrics
    electrificationelectrifierelectrifiers
    electroelectroacousticselectroanalysis
    electrobiologistelectrobiologistselectrobiology
    electrocardiogramelectrocardiogramselectrocardiograph
    electrocardiographselectrocardiographyelectrochemist
    electrochemistryelectrochemistselectrocution
    electrocutionselectrodeelectrodeposition
    electrodeselectrodialysiselectrodynamics
    electrodynamometerelectroencephalogramelectroencephalograph
    electroencephalographyelectroextractionelectroforming
    electrographelectrographselectrography
    electrokineticselectrolierelectroliers
    electroluminescenceelectrolysiselectrolyte
    electrolyteselectrolyticelectromagnet
    electromagneticelectromagnetismelectromagnets
    electromerismelectrometallurgistelectrometallurgy
    electrometerelectrometerselectrometry
    electromotorelectromotorselectromyograph
    electromyographyelectronelectron-volt
    electron-voltselectronegativityelectronics
    electronselectrophoresiselectrophorus
    electrophotographyelectrophysiologistelectrophysiology
    electroplateelectroplaterelectroplates
    electroselectroscopeelectroscopes
    electroshockelectroshockselectrostatics
    electrotechnicselectrotechnologyelectrotherapeutics
    electrotherapyelectrothermicselectrotonus
    electrotypeelectrotyperelectrotypers
    electrotypeselectrotypistelectrotypists
    electrotypyelectrovalencyelectrowinning
    electrowinningselectrumelects
    electuarieselectuaryelegance
    elegancyelegiacelegiacs
    elegieselegistelegists
    elegitelegitselement
    elementalelementalselementariness
    elementselenchuselephant
    elephant’s-earelephant’s-earselephant’s-foot
    elephantiasiselephantselevation
    elevationselevatorelevators
    eleveneleven-pluselevens
    eleventheleventhselevon
    elevonselfinselfish
    elflandelflockelflocks
    elicitationelicitationselicitor
    elicitorseligibilityeliminant
    eliminantseliminationeliminations
    eliminatoreliminatorselision
    elisionseliteselitism
    elitistelitistselixir
    elixirselkhoundelkhounds
    ellipseellipsesellipsis
    ellipsographellipsographsellipsoid
    ellipsoidsellipticitiesellipticity
    elmwoodelocutionelocutionist
    elocutionistselocutionseloigner
    eloignerseloignmenteloignments
    eloinereloinerselongation
    elongationselopementelopements
    elopereloperselops
    eloquenceeloquenceseluant
    eluantseluateeluates
    elucidationelucidationselucidator
    elucidatorseludereluders
    eludingeluenteluents
    elusionelusionselusiveness
    elutionelutriationelutriator
    elutriatorseluviumeluviums
    elverselytraelytron
    elytronselytrum

    278 Nouns That Start With EM

    EmmanuelThe name given to Christ as the deliverer of Judah prophesied by Isaiah (Isa. 7:14, 8:8; Matt. 1:23).
    EmmyA statuette awarded annually to an outstanding television program or performer.
    EmmysA statuette awarded annually to an outstanding television program or performer.
    embargoAn official ban on trade or other commercial activity with a particular country. usually be embargoed archaic
    embargosAn official ban on trade or other commercial activity with a particular country. usually be embargoed archaic
    embassyThe official residence or offices of an ambassador. mainly historical
    emberA small piece of burning or glowing coal or wood in a dying fire.
    embersA small piece of burning or glowing coal or wood in a dying fire.
    emblemA heraldic device or symbolic object as a distinctive badge of a nation, organization, or family.
    emblemsA heraldic device or symbolic object as a distinctive badge of a nation, organization, or family.
    embolismObstruction of an artery, typically by a clot of blood or an air bubble.
    embolusA blood clot, air bubble, piece of fatty deposit, or other object which has been carried in the bloodstream to lodge in a vessel and cause an embolism.
    embouchurethe position and use of the lips, tongue, and teeth in playing a wind instrument
    embraceHold (someone) closely in one’s arms, especially as a sign of affection. Accept or support (a belief, theory, or change) willingly and enthusiastically. Include or contain (something) as a constituent part. An act of holding someone closely in one’s arms. in singular
    embracesHold (someone) closely in one’s arms, especially as a sign of affection. Accept or support (a belief, theory, or change) willingly and enthusiastically. Include or contain (something) as a constituent part. An act of holding someone closely in one’s arms. in singular
    embryoAn unborn or unhatched offspring in the process of development, in particular a human offspring during the period from approximately the second to the eighth week after fertilization (after which it is usually termed a fetus). A thing at a rudimentary stage that shows potential for development.
    embryosAn unborn or unhatched offspring in the process of development, in particular a human offspring during the period from approximately the second to the eighth week after fertilization (after which it is usually termed a fetus). A thing at a rudimentary stage that shows potential for development.
    emceeA master of ceremonies. Perform the role of a master of ceremonies at (a public entertainment or a large social occasion).
    emceesA master of ceremonies. Perform the role of a master of ceremonies at (a public entertainment or a large social occasion).
    emeForming nouns denoting linguistic units that are in systemic contrast with one other.
    emeraldA bright green precious stone consisting of a chromium-rich variety of beryl. A bright green color like that of an emerald. A small hummingbird with bright metallic green plumage and darker wings and tail, found mainly in the area of the Caribbean and Central America. Bright green in color.
    emeraldsA bright green precious stone consisting of a chromium-rich variety of beryl. A bright green color like that of an emerald. A small hummingbird with bright metallic green plumage and darker wings and tail, found mainly in the area of the Caribbean and Central America. Bright green in color.
    emergentIn the process of coming into being or becoming prominent. Ecology Philosophy Ecology
    emeritus(of the former holder of an office, especially a college professor) having retired but allowed to retain their title as an honor.
    emersionThe process or state of emerging from or being out of water after being submerged.
    emeryA grayish-black mixture of corundum and magnetite, used in powdered form as an abrasive.
    emesisThe action or process of vomiting.
    emetic(of a substance) causing vomiting. A medicine or other substance which causes vomiting.
    emetics(of a substance) causing vomiting. A medicine or other substance which causes vomiting.
    emetineAn alkaloid present in ipecac and formerly used in the treatment of amoebic infections and as an emetic in aversion therapy.
    emigrantA person who leaves their own country in order to settle permanently in another. Used by emigrants.
    eminenceFame or recognized superiority, especially within a particular sphere or profession. formal, literary
    emirA title of various Muslim (mainly Arab) rulers.
    emirateThe rank, lands, or reign of an emir.
    emiratesThe rank, lands, or reign of an emir.
    emirsA title of various Muslim (mainly Arab) rulers.
    emissaryA person sent on a special mission, usually as a diplomatic representative.
    emissionThe production and discharge of something, especially gas or radiation.
    emitterA machine, device, etc. , that emits something.
    emmerAn old kind of Eurasian wheat with bearded ears and spikelets that each contain two grains, now grown mainly for fodder and breakfast cereals.
    emmetAn ant.
    emmetsAn ant.
    emotionA natural instinctive state of mind deriving from one’s circumstances, mood, or relationships with others.
    empathyThe ability to understand and share the feelings of another.
    emperorA sovereign ruler of great power and rank, especially one ruling an empire.
    emperyIn broader sense
    emphasisSpecial importance, value, or prominence given to something.
    emphaticShowing or giving emphasis; expressing something forcibly and clearly. An emphatic consonant.
    empireAn extensive group of states or countries under a single supreme authority, formerly especially an emperor or empress. A large commercial organization owned or controlled by one person or group. A variety of apple. Denoting a style of furniture, decoration, or dress fashionable during the First or (less commonly) the Second Empire in France. The decorative style was neoclassical but marked by an interest in Egyptian and other ancient motifs probably inspired by Napoleon’s Egyptian campaigns.
    empiresAn extensive group of states or countries under a single supreme authority, formerly especially an emperor or empress. A large commercial organization owned or controlled by one person or group. A variety of apple. Denoting a style of furniture, decoration, or dress fashionable during the First or (less commonly) the Second Empire in France. The decorative style was neoclassical but marked by an interest in Egyptian and other ancient motifs probably inspired by Napoleon’s Egyptian campaigns.
    empiricarchaic
    employGive work to (someone) and pay them for it. Make use of. The state or fact of being employed for wages or a salary.
    employeeA person employed for wages or salary, especially at nonexecutive level.
    employerA person or organization that employs people.
    employsGive work to (someone) and pay them for it. Make use of. The state or fact of being employed for wages or a salary.
    emporiumA large retail store selling a wide variety of goods.
    empressA woman who is a sovereign ruler of great power and rank, especially one ruling an empire.
    emprisearchaic archaic archaic, rare archaic
    emptierContaining nothing; not filled or occupied. (of words or a gesture) lacking meaning or sincerity. Having no value or purpose. informal Remove all the contents of (a container)usually empties
    emptiesContaining nothing; not filled or occupied. (of words or a gesture) lacking meaning or sincerity. Having no value or purpose. informal Remove all the contents of (a container)usually empties
    emptyContaining nothing; not filled or occupied. (of words or a gesture) lacking meaning or sincerity. Having no value or purpose. informal Remove all the contents of (a container)usually empties
    empyemaThe collection of pus in a cavity in the body, especially in the pleural cavity.
    emuA large flightless fast-running Australian bird resembling the ostrich, with shaggy gray or brown plumage, bare blue skin on the head and neck, and three-toed feet. Electric multiple unit. Electromagnetic unit(s). Economic and Monetary Union (or European Monetary Union). An electric multiple unit (train).
    emusA large flightless fast-running Australian bird resembling the ostrich, with shaggy gray or brown plumage, bare blue skin on the head and neck, and three-toed feet. Electric multiple unit. Electromagnetic unit(s). Economic and Monetary Union (or European Monetary Union). An electric multiple unit (train).
    EmdenEmersonEmilia
    Emilia-RomagnaEmilyEmlyn
    EmmelineEmmenthalEmmenthaler
    EmmiesEmpedoclesEmpson
    Emsworthemaciationemanations
    emancipationemancipationistemancipations
    emancipatoremancipatorsemancipist
    emancipistsemarginationemarginations
    emasculationemasculationsemasculator
    emasculatorsembalmerembalmers
    embalmmentembalmmentsembankment
    embankmentsembarcationembarcations
    embargoesembarkationembarkations
    embarkmentembarkmentsembarrassment
    embarrassmentsembassadorembassage
    embassagesembassiesembattlement
    embattlementsembaymentembayments
    embeddingembedmentembedments
    embellisherembellishersembellishment
    embellishmentsembezzlementembezzlements
    embezzlerembezzlersembitterer
    embitterersembittermentembitterments
    emblazoneremblazonersemblazonment
    emblazonmentsemblazonryemblematist
    emblematistsembodimentembodiments
    emboliesembolismsemboluses
    embolyembonpointembosser
    embossersembossmentembossments
    embouchuresembracementembracements
    embraceorembraceorsembracer
    embracersembraceryembracing
    embranchmentembranglementembranglements
    embrasureembrasuresembrittlement
    embrocationembrocationsembroiderer
    embroiderersembroideriesembroidery
    embroilmentembroilmentsembryogeny
    embryologistembryologistsembryology
    embryotomiesembryotomyembryulcia
    embryulciasemeeremeers
    emendationemendationsemendator
    emendatorsemergenceemergences
    emergenciesemergencyemeries
    emersionsemesemeu
    emeusemictionemigrants
    emigrationemigrationseminences
    eminencieseminencyemissaries
    emissionsemissivityemmenagogue
    emmenagoguesemmetropeemmetropes
    emmetropiaemollientemollients
    emollitionemollitionsemolument
    emolumentsemotionalismemotionality
    emotivismempalementempalements
    empathiesempennageempennages
    emperorshipemperorshipsemphasises
    emphasizingemphaticalnessemphysema
    emphysemasempire-builderempire-builders
    empiricismempiricistempiricists
    emplacementemplacementsemployees
    employersemploymentemployments
    empoisonmentemporiumsempowerment
    empressementempressesemprises
    emptiersemptinessemptyings
    empurpledempyreansempyreuma
    empyreumasemu-wrenemulation
    emulationsemulatoremulators
    emulousnessemulsificationemulsifications
    emulsifieremulsifiersemulsions
    emulsoidemulsoidsemunctories
    emunctory

    580 Nouns Starting With EN

    EndymionA remarkably beautiful young man, loved by the Moon (Selene). According to one story, he was put in an eternal sleep by Zeus for having fallen in love with Hera, and was then visited every night by Selene.
    EnglandA European country that forms the largest and most southern part of Great Britain and of the United Kingdom, surrounded on three sides by water (Irish Sea on west, English Channel on south, North Sea on east); population 51,446,000 (est. 2008); capital, London; language, English.
    EnglishRelating to England or its people or language. The language of England, widely used in many varieties throughout the world. as plural noun the EnglishNorth American
    EnidA city in north central Oklahoma; population 47,396 (est. 2008).
    Enoch(in the Bible) the eldest son of Cain. A Hebrew patriarch, father of Methuselah.
    EnschedeA city in the eastern Netherlands; population 154,753 (2008).
    enablerA person or thing that makes something possible.
    enablersA person or thing that makes something possible.
    enamelAn opaque or semitransparent glassy substance applied to metallic or other hard surfaces for ornament or as a protective coating. Coat or decorate (a metallic or hard object) with enamel.
    enamelsAn opaque or semitransparent glassy substance applied to metallic or other hard surfaces for ornament or as a protective coating. Coat or decorate (a metallic or hard object) with enamel.
    enationAn outgrowth from the surface of a leaf or other part of a plant.
    enationsAn outgrowth from the surface of a leaf or other part of a plant.
    enceinteAn enclosure or the enclosing wall of a fortified place. Pregnant.
    enclaveA portion of territory within or surrounded by a larger territory whose inhabitants are culturally or ethnically distinct.
    enclavesA portion of territory within or surrounded by a larger territory whose inhabitants are culturally or ethnically distinct.
    encliticA word pronounced with so little emphasis that it is shortened and forms part of the preceding word, e. g. , n’t in can’t. Denoting or relating to an enclitic.
    encodingConvert into a coded form.
    encomiumA speech or piece of writing that praises someone or something highly.
    encoreA repeated or additional performance of an item at the end of a concert, as called for by an audience. Called out by an audience at the end of a concert to request an additional performance. Give or call for a repeated or additional performance of (an item) at the end of a concert.
    encoresA repeated or additional performance of an item at the end of a concert, as called for by an audience. Called out by an audience at the end of a concert to request an additional performance. Give or call for a repeated or additional performance of (an item) at the end of a concert.
    encrustCover (something) with a hard surface layer.
    encrustsCover (something) with a hard surface layer.
    endA final part of something, especially a period of time, an activity, or a story. The furthest or most extreme part or point of something. A goal or result that one seeks to achieve. (in lawn bowling and curling) a session of play in one particular direction across the playing area. American Football Come or bring to a final point; finish.
    end-allThe thing that is final or definitive.
    endeavorTry hard to do or achieve something. An attempt to achieve a goal.
    endemic(of a disease) regularly occurring within an area or community. (of a plant or animal) native and restricted to a certain place. An endemic plant or animal.
    endemics(of a disease) regularly occurring within an area or community. (of a plant or animal) native and restricted to a certain place. An endemic plant or animal.
    endemismThe degree to which the plants and animals of a particular area are both native and restricted to it.
    endgameThe final stage of a game such as chess or bridge, when few pieces or cards remain.
    endgamesThe final stage of a game such as chess or bridge, when few pieces or cards remain.
    endingAn end or final part of something, especially a period of time, an activity, or a book or movie.
    endingsAn end or final part of something, especially a period of time, an activity, or a book or movie.
    endiveBritish
    endivesBritish
    endocarpThe innermost layer of the pericarp which surrounds a seed in a fruit. It may be membranous (as in apples) or woody (as in the stone of a peach or cherry).
    endodermThe innermost layer of cells or tissue of an embryo in early development, or the parts derived from this, which include the lining of the gut and associated structures.
    endogamyAnthropology
    endorseeA person to whom a check or bill of exchange is made payable instead of the stated payee.
    endpaperA blank or decorated leaf of paper at the beginning or end of a book, especially one fixed to the inside of the cover.
    endplayA way of playing in the last few tricks which forces an opponent to make a disadvantageous lead. Force (an opponent) to make an endplay.
    endsA neighborhood or urban area, especially one where a person lives or grew up.
    eneEast-northeast.
    enemaA procedure in which liquid or gas is injected into the rectum, typically to expel its contents, but also to introduce drugs or permit X-ray imaging.
    enemasA procedure in which liquid or gas is injected into the rectum, typically to expel its contents, but also to introduce drugs or permit X-ray imaging.
    enemiesA person who is actively opposed or hostile to someone or something.
    enemyA person who is actively opposed or hostile to someone or something.
    energidOriginally
    energyThe strength and vitality required for sustained physical or mental activity. Power derived from the utilization of physical or chemical resources, especially to provide light and heat or to work machines. Physics
    engineA machine with moving parts that converts power into motion. A railroad locomotive.
    enginesA machine with moving parts that converts power into motion. A railroad locomotive.
    engramA hypothetical permanent change in the brain accounting for the existence of memory; a memory trace.
    engramsA hypothetical permanent change in the brain accounting for the existence of memory; a memory trace.
    enigmaA person or thing that is mysterious, puzzling, or difficult to understand.
    enigmasA person or thing that is mysterious, puzzling, or difficult to understand.
    enmityThe state or feeling of being actively opposed or hostile to someone or something.
    enneadA group or set of nine.
    enneadsA group or set of nine.
    ennuiA feeling of listlessness and dissatisfaction arising from a lack of occupation or excitement.
    enologyThe study of wines.
    enosisThe political union of Cyprus and Greece, as an aim or ideal of certain Greeks and Cypriots.
    enoughAs much or as many as required. As much or as many of something as required. To the required degree or extent (used after an adjective, adverb, or verb)
    enquiryAn act of asking for information.
    ensEnsign.
    ensignA flag or standard, especially a military or naval one indicating nationality. A commissioned officer of the lowest rank in the US Navy and Coast Guard, ranking above chief warrant officer and below lieutenant.
    ensignsA flag or standard, especially a military or naval one indicating nationality. A commissioned officer of the lowest rank in the US Navy and Coast Guard, ranking above chief warrant officer and below lieutenant.
    ensureMake certain that (something) shall occur or be the case.
    ensuresMake certain that (something) shall occur or be the case.
    entailInvolve (something) as a necessary or inevitable part or consequence. Law Law
    entailsInvolve (something) as a necessary or inevitable part or consequence. Law Law
    entasisA slight convex curve in the shaft of a column, introduced to correct the visual illusion of concavity produced by a straight shaft.
    ententeA friendly understanding or informal alliance between states or factions.
    entererA person who (or occasionally a thing which) goes or comes into a place, situation, etc. Formerly also occasionally with in. A person who records or submits something, especially in writing; one who adds to a register, database, etc. An entrant in a race, contest, competition, etc.
    entireWith no part left out; whole. An uncastrated male horse.
    entiresWith no part left out; whole. An uncastrated male horse.
    entityA thing with distinct and independent existence.
    entrantA person or group that enters, joins, or takes part in something.
    entriesAn act of going or coming in. An item written or printed in a diary, list, ledger, or reference book. A person or thing competing in a race or competition. The forward part of a ship’s hull below the waterline, considered in terms of breadth or narrowness.
    entropyLack of order or predictability; gradual decline into disorder. (in information theory) a logarithmic measure of the rate of transfer of information in a particular message or language.
    entryAn act of going or coming in. An item written or printed in a diary, list, ledger, or reference book. A person or thing competing in a race or competition. The forward part of a ship’s hull below the waterline, considered in terms of breadth or narrowness.
    enviesA feeling of discontented or resentful longing aroused by someone else’s possessions, qualities, or luck. Desire to have a quality, possession, or other desirable attribute belonging to (someone else)
    envoiA short stanza concluding a ballade. literary
    envoisA short stanza concluding a ballade. literary
    envoyA messenger or representative, especially one on a diplomatic mission. A minister plenipotentiary, ranking below ambassador and above chargé d’affaires.
    envoysA messenger or representative, especially one on a diplomatic mission. A minister plenipotentiary, ranking below ambassador and above chargé d’affaires.
    envyA feeling of discontented or resentful longing aroused by someone else’s possessions, qualities, or luck. Desire to have a quality, possession, or other desirable attribute belonging to (someone else)
    enzymeA substance produced by a living organism which acts as a catalyst to bring about a specific biochemical reaction.
    enzymesA substance produced by a living organism which acts as a catalyst to bring about a specific biochemical reaction.
    EnaEnceladusEnders
    EnfieldEngelbertEngels
    EnglanderEnglandersEnglisher
    EnglishismEnglishmanEnglishness
    EnglishryEnglishwomanEnnis
    EnniskillenEnniusEnos
    EntebbeEntre-Deux-MersEnzed
    enactmentenactmentsenactor
    enactorsenallageenameler
    enamelersenamelistenamelists
    enamellerenamellersenamellist
    enamellistsenantiomerenantiomorph
    enantiomorphismenantiomorphsenantiosis
    enantiotropyenarthrosisenate
    encaeniaencampmentencampments
    encapsulationencapsulationsencarpus
    encarpusesencasementencasements
    encausticencausticsenceintes
    encephalinencephalinsencephalitis
    encephalogramencephalogramsencephalograph
    encephalographsencephalographyencephalon
    encephalonsencephalopathyencephalotomies
    encephalotomyenchainmentenchainments
    enchanterenchantersenchantment
    enchantmentsenchantressenchantresses
    enchiladaenchiladasenchiridion
    enchiridionsenchondromaenchondromas
    encinctureencincturesencirclement
    encirclementsencliticsencloser
    enclosersenclosingenclosure
    enclosuresencoderencoders
    encoignureencoignuresencolpion
    encolpionsencomiastencomiasts
    encomiendaencomiumsencompassment
    encompassmentsencounterencounters
    encouragementencouragementsencourager
    encouragersencriniteencrinites
    encroacherencroachersencroachment
    encroachmentsencrustationencrustations
    encryptionencryptionsencumbrance
    encumbrancerencumbrancersencumbrances
    encyclicalencyclicalsencyclopaedia
    encyclopaediasencyclopediaencyclopedias
    encyclopedismencyclopedistencyclopedists
    encystationencystationsencystment
    encystmentsendamagementendamoeba
    endangermentendearmentendearments
    endeavorsendeavourendeavours
    endlessnessendoblastendoblasts
    endocarditisendocardiumendocardiums
    endocarpsendocrineendocrinologist
    endocrinologistsendocrinologyendodermis
    endodermsendogamiesendogen
    endogensendogenyendolymph
    endolymphsendometriosisendometritis
    endometriumendometriumsendomorph
    endomorphsendomorphyendoparasite
    endoparasitesendophyteendophytes
    endoplasmendoplasmsendopodite
    endopoditesendorphinendorphins
    endorseesendorsementendorsements
    endorserendorsersendosarc
    endosarcsendoscopeendoscopes
    endoscopiesendoscopyendoskeleton
    endoskeletonsendosmosisendosperm
    endospermsendosporeendospores
    endosteumendosteumsendothelium
    endowerendowersendowment
    endowmentsendozoaendpapers
    endurablenessenduranceendurances
    endurerendurersenergetics
    energidsenergiesenergiser
    energisersenergizerenergizers
    energizingenergumenenergumens
    enervationenfacementenfacements
    enfeeblementenfeoffmentenfeoffments
    enfiladesenfoldingenfoldment
    enfoldmentsenforcementenforcements
    enforcersenfranchisementenfranchisements
    engagementengagementsengagingness
    engendererengendermentengineer
    engineeringengineersengobe
    engorgementengorgementsengraftation
    engraftmentengraftmentsengrailment
    engrailmentsengraversengraving
    engravingsengrosserengrossers
    engrossmentengrossmentsengulfment
    engulfmentsenhancementenhancements
    enhancersenjambementenjambements
    enjambmentenjambmentsenjoiner
    enjoinersenjoiningenjoinment
    enjoinmentsenjoyablenessenjoyer
    enjoyersenjoymentenjoyments
    enkephalinenkephalinsenlacement
    enlacementsenlargednessenlargement
    enlargementsenlargerenlargers
    enlightenedenlightenmentenlightenments
    enlistingenlistmentenlistments
    enlivenerenlivenersenlivenment
    enlivenmentsenmeshmentenmities
    ennageenneagonenneagons
    enneahedronenneahedronsennoblement
    ennoblementsennuisenormities
    enormityenormousnessenoughs
    enquirerenquirersenquiries
    enragementenragementsenrichment
    enrichmentsenrollerenrollers
    enrollmentenrollmentsenrolment
    enrolmentsensampleensamples
    ensembleensemblesenshrinement
    enshrinementsensignciesensigncy
    ensignshipensignshipsensilage
    ensilagesenslavementenslavements
    enslaverenslaversenslaving
    ensnarementenstatiteenstatites
    ensurerensurersenswathement
    entablatureentablaturesentablement
    entablementsentailerentailers
    entailmententailmentsentanglement
    entanglementsentelechiesentelechy
    entellusentellusesententes
    enterectomiesenterectomyenterers
    enteringenteringsenteritis
    enteronenteropneustenteropneusts
    enterostomiesenterostomyenterotomies
    enterotomyenterovirusenteroviruses
    enterpriseenterpriserenterprisers
    enterprisesentertainerentertainers
    entertainmententertainmentsenthalpy
    enthrallmententhrallmentsenthralment
    enthralmentsenthronemententhronements
    enthronizationenthronizationsenthusiasm
    enthusiasmsenthusiastenthusiasts
    enthymemeenthymemesenticement
    enticementsentirenessentirety
    entitiesentitlemententitlements
    entoblastentoblastsentoderm
    entodermsentombmententombments
    entomologistentomologistsentomology
    entomophilyentomostracanentomostracans
    entophyteentophytesentourage
    entouragesentozoaentozoon
    entr’acteentr’actesentrails
    entranceentrancemententrancements
    entrancesentrantsentrapment
    entrapmentsentrapperentrappers
    entreatiesentreatmententreatments
    entreatyentrechatentrechats
    entremetsentrenchmententrenchments
    entrepotentrepotsentrepreneur
    entrepreneursentrepreneurshipentrepreneuse
    entrepreneusesentresolentresols
    entrustmententrustmentsenucleation
    enucleationsenumerationenumerations
    enumeratorenumeratorsenunciation
    enunciationsenunciatorenunciators
    enuresisenvelopeenvelopes
    envelopingenvelopmentenvelopments
    enviablenessenvierenviers
    enviousnessenvironmentenvironmentalism
    environmentalistenvironmentsenvirons
    envisagementenvisagementsenvisioning
    enzooticenzooticsenzymologist
    enzymologistsenzymology
    Nouns That Start With E

    14 Words That Start With EO Nouns

    EolicOf or relating to Aeolia or to the Aeolians or their language; Aeolian. Geology Any of a group of ancient Greek dialects, including those of Aeolia, Lesbos, Thessaly, and Boeotia.
    eolitha very crudely chipped flint
    eolithsA roughly chipped flint found in Tertiary strata, originally thought to be an early artifact but probably of natural origin.
    eonoften eonsPhilosophy
    eosinA red fluorescent dye that is a bromine derivative of fluorescein, or one of its salts or other derivatives.
    eosinophilA white blood cell containing granules that are readily stained by eosin.
    eosinophiliaAn increase in the number of eosinophils in the blood, occurring in response to some allergens, drugs, and parasites, and in some types of leukemia.
    Eoineolipileeolipiles
    eons

    249 Nouns Beginning With EP

    EphesusAn ancient Greek city on the western coast of Asia Minor, in modern Turkey, site of the temple of Diana. It is an important center of early Christianity. St. Paul preached here, and St. John is said to have lived here.
    Epictetus(c. AD 55–c. 135), Greek philosopher. He preached the common brotherhood of man and advocated a Stoic philosophy.
    EpicureanA disciple or student of the Greek philosopher Epicurus. Of or concerning Epicurus or his ideas.
    Epicurus(341–270 BC), Greek philosopher, founder of Epicureanism. His physics is based on Democritus’ theory of a materialist universe composed of indestructible atoms moving in a void, unregulated by divine providence.
    EpiphanyThe manifestation of Christ to the Gentiles as represented by the Magi (Matthew 2:1–12).
    EpsomA town in Surrey, southeastern England; population 35,000 (est. 2009). Its natural mineral waters were used in the production of Epsom salts. The annual Derby and Oaks horse races are held at its racecourse on Epsom Downs.
    epactThe number of days by which the solar year differs from the lunar year.
    epactsThe number of days by which the solar year differs from the lunar year.
    eparchThe chief bishop of an eparchy.
    eparchsThe chief bishop of an eparchy.
    eparchyA province of the Orthodox Church.
    epauletAn ornamental shoulder piece on an item of clothing, especially on the coat or jacket of a military uniform.
    epergneAn ornamental centerpiece for a dining table, typically used for holding fruit or flowers.
    epergnesAn ornamental centerpiece for a dining table, typically used for holding fruit or flowers.
    ephahAn ancient Hebrew dry measure equivalent to a bushel (35 l).
    ephahsAn ancient Hebrew dry measure equivalent to a bushel (35 l).
    ephebe(in ancient Greece) a young man of 18–20 years undergoing military training.
    ephebes(in ancient Greece) a young man of 18–20 years undergoing military training.
    ephedraAn evergreen shrub of warm arid regions which has trailing or climbing stems and tiny scale-like leaves.
    ephedrasAn evergreen shrub of warm arid regions which has trailing or climbing stems and tiny scale-like leaves.
    ephedrineA crystalline alkaloid drug obtained from some ephedras. It causes constriction of the blood vessels and widening of the bronchial passages, and is used to relieve asthma and hay fever.
    ephemeraThings that exist or are used or enjoyed for only a short time.
    ephemeralLasting for a very short time. An ephemeral plant.
    ephemerisAstronomy Astrology
    ephemeronAn insect that lives only for a day or a few days.
    ephod(in ancient Israel) a sleeveless garment worn by Jewish priests.
    ephods(in ancient Israel) a sleeveless garment worn by Jewish priests.
    ephor(in ancient Greece) one of five senior Spartan magistrates.
    ephors(in ancient Greece) one of five senior Spartan magistrates.
    epiblastThe outermost layer of an embryo before it differentiates into ectoderm and mesoderm.
    epicA long poem, typically one derived from ancient oral tradition, narrating the deeds and adventures of heroic or legendary figures or the history of a nation. Relating to or characteristic of an epic or epics.
    epicalyxA whorl of sepal-like parts located immediately beneath the calyx in the flowers of certain plants.
    epicediumA funeral ode.
    epiceneHaving characteristics of both sexes or no characteristics of either sex; of indeterminate sex. Grammar An epicene person.
    epicenesHaving characteristics of both sexes or no characteristics of either sex; of indeterminate sex. Grammar An epicene person.
    epicenterThe point on the earth’s surface vertically above the focus of an earthquake.
    epicistAn epic poet; a creator of epics.
    epicistsAn epic poet; a creator of epics.
    epicotylThe region of an embryo or seedling stem above the cotyledon.
    epicsA long poem, typically one derived from ancient oral tradition, narrating the deeds and adventures of heroic or legendary figures or the history of a nation. Relating to or characteristic of an epic or epics.
    epicureA person who takes particular pleasure in fine food and drink.
    epicuresA person who takes particular pleasure in fine food and drink.
    epicycleGeometry
    epidemicA widespread occurrence of an infectious disease in a community at a particular time. (of a disease) occurring widely in a community at a particular time.
    epidermisesAnatomy Zoology
    epidoteA lustrous yellow-green crystalline mineral, common in metamorphic rocks. It consists of a hydroxyl silicate of calcium, aluminum, and iron.
    epiduralOn or around the dura mater, in particular (of an anesthetic) introduced into the space around the dura mater of the spinal cord. An epidural anesthetic, used especially in childbirth to produce loss of sensation below the waist.
    epigoneA less distinguished follower or imitator of someone, especially an artist or philosopher.
    epigonesA less distinguished follower or imitator of someone, especially an artist or philosopher.
    epigramA pithy saying or remark expressing an idea in a clever and amusing way.
    epigramsA pithy saying or remark expressing an idea in a clever and amusing way.
    epigraphAn inscription on a building, statue, or coin.
    epilatorA device that removes unwanted body hair by pulling it from the root.
    epilepsyA neurological disorder marked by sudden recurrent episodes of sensory disturbance, loss of consciousness, or convulsions, associated with abnormal electrical activity in the brain.
    epilogA section or speech at the end of a book or play that serves as a comment on or a conclusion to what has happened.
    epilogsA section or speech at the end of a book or play that serves as a comment on or a conclusion to what has happened.
    epilogueA section or speech at the end of a book or play that serves as a comment on or a conclusion to what has happened.
    epimerEach of two isomers with different configurations of atoms around one of several asymmetric carbon atoms present.
    epimersEach of two isomers with different configurations of atoms around one of several asymmetric carbon atoms present.
    epiphyteA plant that grows on another plant but is not parasitic, such as the numerous ferns, bromeliads, air plants, and orchids growing on tree trunks in tropical rainforests.
    episcopeAn optical projector which gives images of opaque objects.
    episodeAn event or a group of events occurring as part of a larger sequence; an incident or period considered in isolation.
    episodesAn event or a group of events occurring as part of a larger sequence; an incident or period considered in isolation.
    episomeA genetic element inside some bacterial cells, especially the DNA of some bacteriophages, that can replicate independently of the host and also in association with a chromosome with which it becomes integrated.
    episomesA genetic element inside some bacterial cells, especially the DNA of some bacteriophages, that can replicate independently of the host and also in association with a chromosome with which it becomes integrated.
    epistleformal, humorous
    epistlesformal, humorous
    epistyleAn architrave.
    epitaphA phrase or form of words written in memory of a person who has died, especially as an inscription on a tombstone.
    epitaphsA phrase or form of words written in memory of a person who has died, especially as an inscription on a tombstone.
    epitaxyThe natural or artificial growth of crystals on a crystalline substrate determining their orientation.
    epithetAn adjective or descriptive phrase expressing a quality characteristic of the person or thing mentioned.
    epithetsAn adjective or descriptive phrase expressing a quality characteristic of the person or thing mentioned.
    epitomethe epitome ofA summary of a written work; an abstract.
    epitomesthe epitome ofA summary of a written work; an abstract.
    epizoaAn animal that lives on the body of another animal, especially as a parasite.
    epizoonAn animal that lives on the body of another animal, especially as a parasite.
    epochA period of time in history or a person’s life, typically one marked by notable events or particular characteristics.
    epochsA period of time in history or a person’s life, typically one marked by notable events or particular characteristics.
    epodeA form of lyric poem written in couplets, in which a long line is followed by a shorter one. The third section of an ancient Greek choral ode, or of one division of such an ode.
    epodesA form of lyric poem written in couplets, in which a long line is followed by a shorter one. The third section of an ancient Greek choral ode, or of one division of such an ode.
    eponymA person after whom a discovery, invention, place, etc. , is named or thought to be named.
    eponymsA person after whom a discovery, invention, place, etc. , is named or thought to be named.
    eposElectronic point of sale (used to describe retail outlets that record information electronically)
    epoxideAn organic compound whose molecule contains a three-membered ring involving an oxygen atom and two carbon atoms.
    epoxidesAn organic compound whose molecule contains a three-membered ring involving an oxygen atom and two carbon atoms.
    epoxiesAny of a class of adhesives, plastics, or other materials that are polymers of epoxides. Consisting of epoxy. Glue (something) using epoxy resin.
    epoxyAny of a class of adhesives, plastics, or other materials that are polymers of epoxides. Consisting of epoxy. Glue (something) using epoxy resin.
    epsilonThe fifth letter of the Greek alphabet (Ε, ε), transliterated as ‘e. ’. Permittivity.
    epyllionA narrative poem that resembles an epic poem in style, but which is notably shorter.
    EphesianEphesiansEphraim
    EpicureanismEpidaurusEpstein
    epacrisepacrisesepagoge
    epanalepsisepanaphoraepanodos
    epanorthosisepauletsepaulettes
    epeirogenyepencephalonepencephalons
    epenthesisepexegesisepha
    ephasephebosephebus
    ephemeralityephemeralsephemeras
    ephemeridephemeridesephemerids
    ephemeronsepicalyxesepicanthus
    epicanthusesepicarpepicarps
    epicentersepicentresepiclesis
    epicondyleepicycloidepicycloids
    epidemicityepidemiologistepidemiologists
    epidemiologyepidendrumepidendrums
    epidiascopeepidiascopesepididymis
    epidioriteepidotesepidurals
    epigastriumepigastriumsepigenesis
    epigenesistepigenesistsepiglottis
    epiglottisesepigonepigons
    epigrammatistepigrammatistsepigrapher
    epigraphersepigraphiesepigraphist
    epigraphistsepigraphsepigraphy
    epigynyepilationepilations
    epilatorsepilepticepileptics
    epilimnionepilimnionsepilobium
    epilobiumsepilogistepilogists
    epiloguesepinastyepinephrine
    epiphenomenalismepiphenomenalistepiphenomenon
    epiphonemaepiphonemasepiphragm
    epiphragmsepiphysisepiphytes
    epiploonepiploonsepiscopacies
    episcopacyepiscopalianepiscopalianism
    episcopaliansepiscopalismepiscopate
    episcopatesepiscopesepisiotomy
    epispasticepispasticsepisperm
    epispermsepistasisepistaxis
    epistemologistepistemologistsepistemology
    episternumepistolerepistolers
    epistolographyepistropheepistyles
    epitaphistepitaphistsepitasis
    epitaxiesepithalamionepithalamium
    epitheliomaepitheliomasepithelium
    epitheliumsepitomiserepitomisers
    epitomistepitomistsepitomizer
    epitomizersepitrachelionepitrachelions
    epizooticepizooticseponychium
    eponychiumsepopeeepopees
    eposesepsomiteepuration
    epurationsepyllions

    86 Nouns That Start With EQ

    EquuleusA small northern constellation (the Foal or Little Horse), perhaps representing the brother of Pegasus. It has no bright stars. postpositive
    equabilitymarked by lack of variation or change
    equalBeing the same in quantity, size, degree, or value. equal toA person or thing considered to be the same as another in status or quality. Be the same as in number or amount.
    equalisationThe action or process of making things the same in quantity, size, or degree throughout a place or group.
    equaliserA thing that has an equalizing effect.
    equalisersA thing that has an equalizing effect.
    equalitiesThe state of being equal, especially in status, rights, and opportunities.
    equalityThe state of being equal, especially in status, rights, and opportunities.
    equalizationThe action or process of making things the same in quantity, size, or degree throughout a place or group.
    equalizerA thing that has an equalizing effect.
    equalizersA thing that has an equalizing effect.
    equalsBeing the same in quantity, size, degree, or value. equal toA person or thing considered to be the same as another in status or quality. Be the same as in number or amount.
    equanimityMental calmness, composure, and evenness of temper, especially in a difficult situation.
    equatingConsider (one thing) to be the same as or equivalent to another.
    equationMathematics The process of equating one thing with another. Chemistry
    equationsMathematics The process of equating one thing with another. Chemistry
    equatorAn imaginary line drawn around the earth equally distant from both poles, dividing the earth into northern and southern hemispheres and constituting the parallel of latitude 0°.
    equatorialOf, at, or near the equator.
    equatorsAn imaginary line drawn around the earth equally distant from both poles, dividing the earth into northern and southern hemispheres and constituting the parallel of latitude 0°.
    equerriesAn officer of the British royal household who attends or assists members of the royal family.
    equerryAn officer of the British royal household who attends or assists members of the royal family.
    equestrianRelating to horse riding. A rider or performer on horseback.
    equestrianismThe skill or sport of horse riding. As an Olympic sport it is divided into three disciplines
    equestriansRelating to horse riding. A rider or performer on horseback.
    equestrienneA female rider or performer on horseback.
    equestriennesA female rider or performer on horseback.
    equidA mammal of the horse family (Equidae).
    equidsA mammal of the horse family (Equidae).
    equilateralHaving all its sides of the same length.
    equilibristAn acrobat who performs balancing feats, especially a tightrope walker.
    equilibristsAn acrobat who performs balancing feats, especially a tightrope walker.
    equilibriumA state in which opposing forces or influences are balanced.
    equineRelating to or affecting horses or other members of the horse family. A horse or other member of the horse family.
    equinityequine nature or character
    equinoctialHappening at or near the time of an equinox.
    equinoxThe time or date (twice each year) at which the sun crosses the celestial equator, when day and night are of approximately equal length (about September 22 and March 20).
    equinoxesThe time or date (twice each year) at which the sun crosses the celestial equator, when day and night are of approximately equal length (about September 22 and March 20).
    equipagearchaic historical
    equipagesarchaic historical
    equipmentThe necessary items for a particular purpose.
    equipoiseBalance of forces or interests. Balance or counterbalance (something)
    equipoisesBalance of forces or interests. Balance or counterbalance (something)
    equipollentEqual or equivalent in power, effect, or significance.
    equipotential(of a surface or line) composed of points all at the same potential. An equipotential line or surface.
    equippingSupply with the necessary items for a particular purpose.
    equisetumA plant of a genus that comprises the horsetails.
    equisetumsA plant of a genus that comprises the horsetails.
    equitationThe art and practice of horsemanship and horse riding.
    equitiesThe quality of being fair and impartial. The value of the shares issued by a company. The value of a mortgaged property after deduction of charges against it.
    equityThe quality of being fair and impartial. The value of the shares issued by a company. The value of a mortgaged property after deduction of charges against it.
    equivalenceThe condition of being equal or equivalent in value, worth, function, etc.
    equivalencesThe condition of being equal or equivalent in value, worth, function, etc.
    equivalencyequivalence
    equivalentEqual in value, amount, function, meaning, etc. A person or thing that is equal to or corresponds with another in value, amount, function, meaning, etc.
    equivalentsEqual in value, amount, function, meaning, etc. A person or thing that is equal to or corresponds with another in value, amount, function, meaning, etc.
    equivocationThe use of ambiguous language to conceal the truth or to avoid committing oneself; prevarication.
    equivocationsThe use of ambiguous language to conceal the truth or to avoid committing oneself; prevarication.
    equivocatorA person who uses ambiguous language to conceal the truth or avoid commitment.
    equivocatorsA person who uses ambiguous language to conceal the truth or avoid commitment.
    equivoquerare
    equivoquesrare
    equablenessequalisationsequalitarian
    equalitarianismequalitariansequalizations
    equanimitiesequiangularityequidistance
    equidistancesequilibrationequilibrator
    equilibratorsequilibriumsequipollence
    equipollencesequipollenciesequipollency
    equiponderanceequiprobabilityequitableness
    equivalenciesequivocalityequivocalness

    147 Nouns Starting With ER

    EratoThe Muse of lyric poetry and hymns.
    ErebusThe primeval god of darkness, son of Chaos.
    ErfurtAn industrial city in central Germany; population 202,700 (est. 2006).
    ErieAn industrial port city in northwestern Pennsylvania, on Lake Erie; population 103,817 (est. 2008).
    ErinArchaic or poetic/literary name for Ireland.
    Erinys(in Greek mythology) a Fury.
    ErosGreek Mythology Astronomy Sexual love or desire.
    ErseThe Scottish or Irish Gaelic language.
    eraA long and distinct period of history with a particular feature or characteristic. Baseball Equal Rights Amendment.
    erasA long and distinct period of history with a particular feature or characteristic. Baseball Equal Rights Amendment.
    ergA unit of work or energy, equal to the work done by a force of one dyne when its point of application moves one centimeter in the direction of action of the force. An area of shifting sand dunes in the Sahara.
    ergotA fungal disease of rye and other cereals in which black elongated fruiting bodies grow in the ears of the cereal. Eating contaminated food can result in ergotism. A small horny protuberance on the back of each of a horse’s fetlocks.
    ergsA unit of work or energy, equal to the work done by a force of one dyne when its point of application moves one centimeter in the direction of action of the force. An area of shifting sand dunes in the Sahara.
    ericaA plant of the genus Erica (family Ericaceae), especially (in gardening) heather.
    ernForming adjectives such as northern.
    erneThe sea eagle.
    errorA mistake.
    erythrocytesA red blood cell that (in humans) is typically a biconcave disc without a nucleus. Erythrocytes contain the pigment hemoglobin, which imparts the red color to blood, and transport oxygen and carbon dioxide to and from the tissues.
    ErasmusErastianErastianism
    ErastiansErastusEratosthenes
    ErdaErewhonEricsson
    EridanusEritreaEritrean
    EritreansErlangenErnest
    ErnestineErnieErnst
    ErrolErskineeradiation
    eradicationeradicationseradicator
    eradicatorseraserserasion
    erasionserasureerasures
    erectilityerectingerection
    erectionserectnesserector
    erectorseremiteeremites
    eremitismerepsinerethism
    ergateergatesergative
    ergatocraciesergatocracyergodicity
    ergographergographsergometer
    ergometersergonomicsergosterol
    ergotismericericas
    ericserigeronerigerons
    eringoeringoeseringos
    eriophorumeriophorumseristic
    erkerksermines
    ernserodingerodium
    erodiumserosionerosions
    erotesiseroticaeroticism
    eroticserotismerotology
    erotomaniaerotomaniacerrand
    errandserrantryerrata
    erraticerratumerrhine
    errhineserroneousnesserrors
    ersersatzersatzes
    erseserubescenceerubescences
    eructationeructationserudition
    eruptioneruptionseruptiveness
    eruptivityeryngiumeryngiums
    eryngoeryngoeseryngos
    erysipelaserythemaerythrina
    erythrinaserythrismerythrite
    erythriteserythroblasterythroblasts
    erythrocyteerythromycinerythrophobia
    erythropoiesis

    223 Words That Start With ES Nouns

    Esau(in the Bible) the elder of the twin sons of Isaac and Rebecca, who sold his birthright to his brother Jacob and was tricked out of his father’s blessing by his brother (Gen. 25, 27).
    EsdrasEither of two books of the Apocrypha. The first is mainly a compilation from Chronicles, Nehemiah, and Ezra; the second is a record of angelic revelation. (in the Vulgate) the books of Ezra and Nehemiah.
    EskimoA member of an indigenous people inhabiting northern Canada, Alaska, Greenland, and eastern Siberia, traditionally living by hunting (especially of seals) and by fishing. Either of the two main languages spoken by indigenous peoples of the Arctic (Inuit and Yupik), forming a major division of the Eskimo-Aleut family. Relating to the Eskimos or their languages.
    EssenAn industrial city in the Ruhr valley, in northwestern Germany; population 583,200 (est. 2006).
    EsseneA member of an ancient Jewish ascetic sect of the 2nd century BC–2nd century AD in Palestine, who lived in highly organized groups and held property in common. The Essenes are widely regarded as the authors of the Dead Sea Scrolls.
    EssexA county in eastern England; county town, Chelmsford. A town in northwestern Vermont that includes the village of Essex Junction; population 19,649 (est. 2008).
    EsthEsther (in biblical references).
    Esther(in the Bible) a woman chosen on account of her beauty by the Persian king Ahasuerus (generally supposed to be Xerxes I) to be his queen. She used her influence with him to save the Israelites in captivity from persecution.
    escapeno objectwith objectComputing An act of breaking free from confinement or control.
    escapementsA mechanism in a clock or watch that alternately checks and releases the train by a fixed amount and transmits a periodic impulse from the spring or weight to the balance wheel or pendulum.
    escharA dry, dark scab or falling away of dead skin, typically caused by a burn, or by the bite of a mite, or as a result of anthrax infection.
    escortA person, vehicle, or group accompanying another for protection or as a mark of rank. Accompany (someone or something) somewhere, especially for protection or security, or as a mark of rank.
    escrowA bond, deed, or other document kept in the custody of a third party and taking effect only when a specified condition has been fulfilled. Place in custody or trust.
    escudoThe basic monetary unit of Portugal (until the introduction of the euro) and Cape Verde, equal to 100 centavos.
    eskerA long ridge of gravel and other sediment, typically having a winding course, deposited by meltwater from a retreating glacier or ice sheet.
    eskersA long ridge of gravel and other sediment, typically having a winding course, deposited by meltwater from a retreating glacier or ice sheet.
    espialThe action of watching or catching sight of something or someone or the fact of being seen.
    espritThe quality of being lively, vivacious, or witty.
    essA thing shaped like the letter S.
    essayA short piece of writing on a particular subject. formal Attempt or try.
    essaysA short piece of writing on a particular subject. formal Attempt or try.
    esseEssential nature or essence.
    essesA thing shaped like the letter S.
    estA system for self-improvement aimed at developing a person’s potential through intensive group awareness and training sessions. Eastern Standard Time.
    estateAn extensive area of land in the country, usually with a large house, owned by one person, family, or organization. All the money and property owned by a particular person, especially at death. archaic, literary
    esteemRespect and admiration, typically for a person. Respect and admire.
    esterAn organic compound made by replacing the hydrogen of an acid by an alkyl or other organic group. Many naturally occurring fats and essential oils are esters of fatty acids.
    estersAn organic compound made by replacing the hydrogen of an acid by an alkyl or other organic group. Many naturally occurring fats and essential oils are esters of fatty acids.
    EscherichiaEscorialEsculapian
    EsherEskiesEskimos
    EskyEsmeraldaEsperantist
    EsperantoEsquimauEssenes
    EssequiboEssonneEstella
    EstelleEsthoniaEsthonian
    EsthoniansEstoniaEstonian
    Estoniansescadrilleescadrilles
    escaladeescaladesescalation
    escalationsescalatorescalators
    escalloniaescalloniasescallop
    escallopsescalopeescalopes
    escapadeescapadesescapee
    escapeesescapementescaper
    escapersescapesescapism
    escapistescapistsescapologist
    escapologistsescargotescargots
    escaroleescarolesescarp
    escarpmentescarpmentsescarps
    eschaloteschalotsescharotic
    escharseschatologisteschatologists
    eschatologyescheatescheatage
    escheatagesescheatorescheators
    escheatseschewaleschewals
    eschewereschewerseschscholtzia
    escolarescolarsescorts
    escritoireescritoiresescrows
    escuageescuagesescudos
    esculentesculentsescutcheon
    escutcheonsesneesnecy
    esnesesophagusesophaguses
    esotericaesotericismesoteries
    esoterismesoteryespada
    espadasespadrilleespadrilles
    espagnoleespagnoletteespagnolettes
    espalierespaliersesparto
    espartosesperanceespials
    espionageespionagesesplanade
    esplanadesespousalespousals
    espouserespousersespresso
    espressosesquireesquires
    essayeressayersessayist
    essayistsessenceessences
    essentialessentialismessentialist
    essentialistsessentialityessentialness
    essentialsessiveessonite
    establisherestablishersestablishment
    establishmentarianestablishmentarianismestablishments
    estafetteestafettesestaminet
    estaminetsestanciaestancias
    estancieroestancierosestates
    esteemsesterificationesterifications
    esthesiaestheteesthetes
    estheticestheticsestimate
    estimatesestimationestimations
    estimatorestimatorsestivation
    estocestocsestoile
    estoilesestoppageestoppages
    estoppelestoppelsestrade
    estradesestrangednessestrangement
    estrangementsestrangerestrangers
    estrayestraysestreat
    estreatsestrogenestrus
    estuariesestuaryesurience
    esuriencesesurienciesesuriency

    93 Nouns Beginning With ET

    Ethelancestral land
    EthiopiaA country in northeastern Africa, on the Red Sea; population 99,400,000 (estimated 2015); languages, Amharic (official), several other Afro-Asiatic languages; capital, Addis Ababa.
    EthiopianA native or inhabitant of Ethiopia, or a person of Ethiopian descent. Relating to Ethiopia or its people. Zoology
    EthiopicOf, in, or relating to Ge’ez.
    EtonA boys’ public school in southern England, on the River Thames opposite Windsor, founded in 1440 by Henry VI to prepare scholars for King’s College, Cambridge.
    EtonianA past or present member of Eton College. Relating to or typical of Eton College.
    Etoniansa student or former student of Eton College
    EtruriaAn ancient region in western Italy, between the Arno and Tiber Rivers, corresponding approximately to modern Tuscany and parts of Umbria. It was the center of the Etruscan civilization.
    EtruscanRelating to ancient Etruria, its people, or their language. The Etruscan civilization was at its height c. 500 BC and was an important influence on the Romans, who had subdued the Etruscans by the end of the 3rd century BC. A native of ancient Etruria. The language of ancient Etruria, which was written in an alphabet derived from Greek but is not related to any known language.
    EtruscologistAn expert or specialist in Etruscology.
    EtruscologyThe study of ancient Etruscan civilization and culture, or of the language of the Etruscans.
    etaAn estimated time of arrival, in particular the time at which an aircraft or ship is expected to arrive at its destination. A Basque separatist movement in Spain, founded in 1959. Edited to add (used in online discussions to indicate that one has modified the content of a post one has made, typically in order to add something)The seventh letter of the Greek alphabet (Η, η), transliterated as ‘e’ or ‘ē’.
    etalonA device consisting of two reflecting glass plates, employed for measuring small differences in the wavelength of light using the interference it produces.
    etalonsA device consisting of two reflecting glass plates, employed for measuring small differences in the wavelength of light using the interference it produces.
    etasAn estimated time of arrival, in particular the time at which an aircraft or ship is expected to arrive at its destination. A Basque separatist movement in Spain, founded in 1959. Edited to add (used in online discussions to indicate that one has modified the content of a post one has made, typically in order to add something)The seventh letter of the Greek alphabet (Η, η), transliterated as ‘e’ or ‘ē’.
    etchantAn acid or corrosive chemical used in etching; a mordant.
    etchantsAn acid or corrosive chemical used in etching; a mordant.
    etcherto produce (something, such as a pattern or design) on a hard material by eating into the material’s surface (as by acid or laser beam)
    etchersto produce (something, such as a pattern or design) on a hard material by eating into the material’s surface (as by acid or laser beam)
    etchingA print produced by the process of etching.
    etchingsA print produced by the process of etching.
    eternitiesInfinite or unending time.
    eternityInfinite or unending time.
    ethAn Old English letter, ð or Ð, representing the dental fricatives /θ/ and /ð/. It was superseded by the digraph th, but is now used as a phonetic symbol for the voiced dental fricative /ð/.
    ethaneA colorless, odorless, flammable gas which is a constituent of petroleum and natural gas. It is the second member of the alkane series.
    ethanolA colorless volatile flammable liquid which is produced by the natural fermentation of sugars; alcohol.
    etheneethylene
    etherChemistry
    etherificationThe action or process of converting ethanol into ether. In later use more widely
    ethersChemistry
    ethicA set of moral principles, especially ones relating to or affirming a specified group, field, or form of conduct. Relating to moral principles or the branch of knowledge dealing with these.
    ethicalnessEthicality.
    ethicsusually treated as pluralusually treated as singular
    ethmoidA square bone at the root of the nose, forming part of the cranium, and having many perforations through which the olfactory nerves pass to the nose.
    ethnarchHistory The office or position of ethnarch; the period of office of an ethnarch.
    ethnarchiesHistory The office or position of ethnarch; the period of office of an ethnarch.
    ethnarchyHistory The office or position of ethnarch; the period of office of an ethnarch.
    ethnicityThe quality or fact of belonging to a population group or subgroup made up of people who share a common cultural background or descent.
    ethnobotanyThe scientific study of the traditional knowledge and customs of a people concerning plants and their medical, religious, and other uses.
    ethnocentrismEvaluation of other cultures according to preconceptions originating in the standards and customs of one’s own culture.
    ethnographyThe scientific description of the customs of individual peoples and cultures.
    ethnologyThe study of the characteristics of various peoples and the differences and relationships between them.
    ethologyThe science of animal behavior.
    ethosThe characteristic spirit of a culture, era, or community as manifested in its beliefs and aspirations.
    ethosesthe distinguishing character, sentiment, moral nature, or guiding beliefs of a person, group, or institution
    ethylOf or denoting the hydrocarbon radical—C₂H₅, derived from ethane and present in many organic compounds.
    ethylate#ERROR!
    ethylates#ERROR!
    ethyleneA flammable hydrocarbon gas of the alkene series, occurring in natural gas, coal gas, and crude oil and given off by ripening fruit. It is used in chemical synthesis, especially in the manufacture of polyethylene.
    ethylsOf or denoting the hydrocarbon radical—C₂H₅, derived from ethane and present in many organic compounds.
    ethyneacetylene
    etiologyMedicine The investigation or attribution of the cause or reason for something, often expressed in terms of historical or mythical explanation.
    etiquetteThe customary code of polite behavior in society or among members of a particular profession or group.
    etiquettesThe customary code of polite behavior in society or among members of a particular profession or group.
    etnaa device formerly used for heating liquids and consisting of a cup fixed in a saucer in which alcohol is burned
    etnasa device formerly used for heating liquids and consisting of a cup fixed in a saucer in which alcohol is burned
    etymologiesThe study of the origin of words and the way in which their meanings have changed throughout history.
    etymologyThe study of the origin of words and the way in which their meanings have changed throughout history.
    etymonA word or morpheme from which a later word is derived.
    etymonsA word or morpheme from which a later word is derived.
    EthelbertEthiopiansEtons
    etaerioetaerioseternalness
    eternisationeternizationethal
    etherealisationetherealityetherealization
    etherificationsetherizationethicality
    ethnographerethnographersethnographies
    ethnolinguistethnolinguisticsethnolinguists
    ethnologistethnologistsethnomusicologist
    ethologistethologistsetiologies
    etymologistetymologists

    148 Nouns That Start With EU

    EuclidA city in northeastern Ohio, northeast of Cleveland; population 47,415 (est. 2008). (c. 300 BC), Greek mathematician. His Elements of Geometry, which covered plane geometry, the theory of numbers, irrationals, and solid geometry, was the standard work until other kinds of geometry were discovered in the 19th century.
    EugeneA city in west central Oregon, on the Willamette River, home to the University of Oregon; population 150,104 (est. 2008).
    EugeniaA genus of shrubs and trees of the family Myrtaceae with glossy evergreen foliage, widespread in tropical and subtropical regions, especially in the New World tropics.
    Eugenie(1826–1920), Spanish empress of France 1853–70 and wife of Napoleon III; born Eugénia María de Montijo de Guzmán. She was an important influence on her husband’s foreign policy.
    EuglenaA green single-celled freshwater organism with a flagellum, sometimes forming a green scum on stagnant water.
    EurasiaA term used to describe the combined continental landmass of Europe and Asia.
    EurasianOf mixed European (or European American) and Asian parentage. Relating to Eurasia. A person of mixed European (or European American) and Asian parentage.
    EuropaGreek Mythology Astronomy
    EuropeA continent in the northern hemisphere, separated from Africa on the south by the Mediterranean Sea and from Asia on the east roughly by the Bosporus, the Caucasus Mountains, and the Ural Mountains. Europe contains approximately 10 percent of the world’s population. It consists of the western part of the landmass of which Asia forms the eastern (and greater) part and includes the British Isles, Iceland, and most of the Mediterranean islands. Its recent history has been dominated by the decline of European states from their former colonial and economic preeminence, the emergence of the European Union among the wealthy democracies of western Europe, and the collapse of the Soviet Union with consequent changes of power in central and eastern Europe.
    EurydiceThe wife of Orpheus. After she was killed by a snake, Orpheus secured her release from the underworld on the condition that he not look back at her on their way back to the world of the living. But Orpheus did look back, whereupon Eurydice disappeared.
    Eusebius(c. AD 264–c. 340), bishop and church historian; known as Eusebius of Caesaria. His Ecclesiastical History is the principal source for the history of Christianity (especially in the Eastern Church) from the age of the Apostles until 324.
    EuterpeThe Muse of flute playing and lyric poetry.
    eucaryoteany of a domain (Eukarya) or a higher taxonomic group (Eukaryota) above the kingdom that includes organisms composed of one or more cells containing visibly evident nuclei and organelles — compare archaea, bacterium, prokaryote
    euchreA card game for two to four players, usually played with the thirty-two highest cards, the aim being to win at least three of the five tricks played. (in the card game euchre) gain the advantage over (another player) by preventing them from taking three tricks.
    euchresA card game for two to four players, usually played with the thirty-two highest cards, the aim being to win at least three of the five tricks played. (in the card game euchre) gain the advantage over (another player) by preventing them from taking three tricks.
    eucriteGeology
    eucritesGeology
    eugenicsThe study of how to arrange reproduction within a human population to increase the occurrence of heritable characteristics regarded as desirable. Developed largely by Sir Francis Galton as a method of improving the human race, eugenics was increasingly discredited as unscientific and racially biased during the 20th century, especially after the adoption of its doctrines by the Nazis in order to justify their treatment of Jews, disabled people, and other minority groups.
    eugenolA colorless or pale yellow liquid compound present in oil of cloves and other essential oils and used in perfumery.
    eulogiesA speech or piece of writing that praises someone or something highly, typically someone who has just died.
    eulogistA person who praises someone or something highly in speech or writing, especially someone who gives a tribute at a funeral.
    eulogyA speech or piece of writing that praises someone or something highly, typically someone who has just died.
    eunuchA man who has been castrated, especially (in the past) one employed to guard the women’s living areas in an Asian court.
    eunuchsA man who has been castrated, especially (in the past) one employed to guard the women’s living areas in an Asian court.
    euonymusA shrub or small tree that is widely cultivated for its autumn colors and bright fruit.
    euphonyThe quality of being pleasing to the ear, especially through a harmonious combination of words.
    euphuismAn artificial, highly elaborate way of writing or speaking.
    eurekaA cry of joy or satisfaction when one finds or discovers something. A port city in northwestern California, on Humboldt Bay off the Pacific Ocean, a noted lumbering center; population 25,300 (est. 2008).
    europiumThe chemical element of atomic number 63, a soft silvery-white metal of the lanthanide series. Europium oxide is used with yttrium oxide as a red phosphor in color television screens.
    EucharistEucharistsEuler
    EuniceEuphemiaEuphrates
    EuphrosyneEurasiansEuratom
    EureEure-et-LoirEuripides
    EuroclydonEurocommunismEurocrat
    EurocratsEurodollarEurodollars
    EuropeanEuropeanisationEuropeanism
    EuropeanizationEuropeansEurovision
    EurusEustaceeubacteria
    eubacteriumeucaineeucalypt
    eucalyptoleucalyptseucalyptus
    eucalyptuseseucaryoteseucharis
    euchariseseuchlorineeuchologies
    euchologioneuchologionseuchology
    euclaseeudaemonisteudaemonists
    eudemonicseudemonismeudiometer
    eugenicisteugenicistseuhemerism
    euhemeristeuhemeristseukaryote
    eukaryoteseulachoneulachons
    eulogiaeulogisereulogisers
    eulogistseulogiumeulogiums
    eulogizereulogizerseumelanin
    eumelaninseunuchismeunuchoid
    eunuchoidismeuonymuseseupatrid
    eupatridseupepsiaeuphausiid
    euphausiidseuphemismeuphemisms
    euphoniaeuphonieseuphonium
    euphoniumseuphorbiaeuphorbias
    euphorbiumeuphoriaeuphoriant
    euphoriantseuphrasieseuphrasy
    euphroeeuphroeseuphuisms
    euphuisteuphuistseurekas
    eurhythmicseurhythmieseurhythmy
    euripuseuripuseseurypterid
    eurypteridseurythmicseurythmies
    eurythmyeusoleustacy
    eutaxyeuthanasiaeuthanasias
    euthenicseuthenisteuthenists
    eutherianeutrophicationeutrophy
    euxenite
    Nouns That Start With E

    134 Nouns That Start With EV

    EvaEthyl vinyl acetate, a material used as cushioning in running shoes, consisting of a rubbery copolymer of ethylene and vinyl acetate. (in space) extravehicular activity.
    EvanEvangelical. Evangelist.
    evacuant(of a medicine or treatment) acting to induce some kind of bodily discharge. A medicine that induces some kind of bodily discharge, such as an emetic, a sudorific, or especially a laxative.
    evacueeA person evacuated from a place of danger to somewhere safe.
    evangelarchaic North American
    evangelsarchaic North American
    evasionThe action of evading something.
    eveThe day or period of time immediately before an event or occasion. (in the Bible) the first woman, wife of Adam and mother of Cain and Abel.
    evenFlat and smooth. Equal in number, amount, or value. (of a number, such as 2, 6, or 108) divisible by two without a remainder. Make or become even. Used to emphasize something surprising or extreme. The end of the day; evening. A member of an indigenous people of eastern Siberia. The language of the Even, a Tungusic language with about 6,000 speakers, closely related to Evenki. Relating to the Even or their language.
    evenerFlat and smooth. Equal in number, amount, or value. (of a number, such as 2, 6, or 108) divisible by two without a remainder. Make or become even. Used to emphasize something surprising or extreme. The end of the day; evening. A member of an indigenous people of eastern Siberia. The language of the Even, a Tungusic language with about 6,000 speakers, closely related to Evenki. Relating to the Even or their language.
    evenfallThe onset of evening; dusk.
    eveningThe period of time at the end of the day, usually from about 6 p. m. to bedtime. In the evening; every evening.
    evensFlat and smooth. Equal in number, amount, or value. (of a number, such as 2, 6, or 108) divisible by two without a remainder. Make or become even. Used to emphasize something surprising or extreme. The end of the day; evening. A member of an indigenous people of eastern Siberia. The language of the Even, a Tungusic language with about 6,000 speakers, closely related to Evenki. Relating to the Even or their language.
    eventA thing that happens, especially one of importance.
    eventsA thing that happens, especially one of importance.
    eversionThe action of turning a structure or organ outwards or inside out.
    evertingTurn (a structure or organ) outward or inside out.
    evertorAny muscle that turns a part outward; especially the peroneus brevis or peroneus longus, which evert the foot.
    evesThe day or period of time immediately before an event or occasion. (in the Bible) the first woman, wife of Adam and mother of Cain and Abel.
    evilProfoundly immoral and wicked. Profound immorality and wickedness, especially when regarded as a supernatural force.
    evilsProfoundly immoral and wicked. Profound immorality and wickedness, especially when regarded as a supernatural force.
    evoluteA curve which is the locus of the centers of curvature of another curve (its involute).
    evolverA person who or thing which evolves or causes to evolve.
    evzoneA kilted soldier belonging to a select Greek infantry regiment.
    EvadneEvangelineEvans
    EvansvilleEvelynEverest
    EverymanEveshamEvie
    Evitaevacuantsevacuation
    evacuationsevacuatorevacuators
    evacueesevaderevaders
    evaginationevaginationsevaluation
    evaluationsevanescenceevanescences
    evangeliaryevangelicalevangelicalism
    evangelicalnessevangelicalsevangelisation
    evangelisationsevangelismevangelist
    evangelistariesevangelistaryevangelists
    evangelizationevangelizationsevaporability
    evaporateevaporatesevaporation
    evaporationsevaporatorevaporators
    evaporimeterevaporimetersevaporite
    evaporometerevapotranspirationevasions
    evasivenessevectionevections
    even-handednessevenfallsevenings
    evennessevensongevensongs
    eventfulnesseventideeventides
    eventrationeventrationseventualities
    eventualityevergladeeverglades
    evergreenevergreenseverlasting
    everlastingnesseversionsevertors
    everydaynessevictionevictions
    evictorevictorsevidence
    evidencesevil-mindednessevildoer
    evildoersevildoingevilness
    eviscerationeviscerationseviscerator
    evisceratorsevocationevocations
    evocativenessevocatorevocators
    evokerevokersevolutes
    evolutionevolutionismevolutionist
    evolutionistsevolutionsevolvement
    evolvementsevolversevulsion
    evulsionsevzones

    5 Nouns Starting With EW

    eweA female sheep.A member of a people of Ghana, Togo, and Benin.The Kwa language of the Ewe.Relating to the Ewe or their language.
    ewe-neckA horse’s neck of which the upper outline curves downward instead of upward.
    ewerA large jug with a wide mouth, formerly used for carrying water for someone
    to wash in.
    ewersA large jug with a wide mouth, formerly used for carrying water for someone
    to wash in.
    ewesA female sheep.A member of a people of Ghana, Togo, and Benin.The Kwa language of the Ewe.Relating to the Ewe or their language.

    685 Words That Start With EX Nouns

    ExeterA city in southwestern England, the county town of Devon, on the Exe River; population 109,200 (est. 2009). Exeter was founded by the Romans, who called it Isca. A historic town in southeastern New Hampshire, home to Phillips Exeter Academy; population 14,762 (est. 2008).
    exactionformal
    examwith adjective or noun modifier
    examen(especially among Jesuits) a devotional exercise involving reflection on and moral evaluation of one’s thoughts and conduct, typically performed on a daily basis.
    examens(especially among Jesuits) a devotional exercise involving reflection on and moral evaluation of one’s thoughts and conduct, typically performed on a daily basis.
    examineeA person taking an examination or test. A person who is being thoroughly inspected in order to determine their health or condition.
    examinerA person whose job is to inspect something; an inspector. A person who administers and grades examinations to test people’s knowledge or proficiency.
    exampleA thing characteristic of its kind or illustrating a general rule. A person or thing regarded in terms of their fitness to be imitated or the likelihood of their being imitated. Be illustrated or exemplified.
    examplesA thing characteristic of its kind or illustrating a general rule. A person or thing regarded in terms of their fitness to be imitated or the likelihood of their being imitated. Be illustrated or exemplified.
    examswith adjective or noun modifier
    exarch(in the Orthodox Church) a bishop lower in rank than a patriarch and having jurisdiction wider than the metropolitan of a diocese. historical
    exarchs(in the Orthodox Church) a bishop lower in rank than a patriarch and having jurisdiction wider than the metropolitan of a diocese. historical
    excerptA short extract from a film, broadcast, or piece of music or writing. Take (a short extract) from a text.
    excerptsA short extract from a film, broadcast, or piece of music or writing. Take (a short extract) from a text.
    excessAn amount of something that is more than necessary, permitted, or desirable. Lack of moderation in an activity, especially eating or drinking. Exceeding a prescribed or desirable amount.
    excessesAn amount of something that is more than necessary, permitted, or desirable. Lack of moderation in an activity, especially eating or drinking. Exceeding a prescribed or desirable amount.
    exchangeAn act of giving one thing and receiving another (especially of the same type or value) in return. Give something and receive something of the same kind in return.
    exciseA tax levied on certain goods and commodities produced or sold within a country and on licenses granted for certain activities. Charge excise on (goods). Cut out surgically.
    excisesA tax levied on certain goods and commodities produced or sold within a country and on licenses granted for certain activities. Charge excise on (goods). Cut out surgically.
    excisionThe action of excising something.
    excitantA substance which elicits an active physiological or behavioral response.
    exciterA thing that produces excitation, in particular a device that provides a magnetizing current for the electromagnets in a motor or generator.
    excitersA thing that produces excitation, in particular a device that provides a magnetizing current for the electromagnets in a motor or generator.
    excitonA mobile concentration of energy in a crystal formed by an excited electron and an associated hole.
    exclaveA portion of territory of one state completely surrounded by territory of another or others, as viewed by the home territory.
    excretaWaste matter discharged from the body, especially feces and urine.
    excursusA detailed discussion of a particular point in a book, usually in an appendix.
    excusal(typically in legal contexts) the action or fact of excusing or being excused.
    excuseAttempt to lessen the blame attaching to (a fault or offense); seek to defend or justify. Release (someone) from a duty or requirement. A reason or explanation put forward to defend or justify a fault or offense. an excuse for
    excusesAttempt to lessen the blame attaching to (a fault or offense); seek to defend or justify. Release (someone) from a duty or requirement. A reason or explanation put forward to defend or justify a fault or offense. an excuse for
    exedraArchitecture
    exegeteAn expounder or textual interpreter, especially of scripture. Expound or interpret (a text, especially scripture)
    exemptFree from an obligation or liability imposed on others. Free (a person or organization) from an obligation or liability imposed on others. A person who is exempt from something, especially the payment of tax.
    exemptsFree from an obligation or liability imposed on others. Free (a person or organization) from an obligation or liability imposed on others. A person who is exempt from something, especially the payment of tax.
    exequyFuneral rites; obsequies.
    exergueA small space or inscription below the principal emblem on a coin or medal, usually on the reverse side.
    exhaustDrain (someone) of their physical or mental resources; tire out. Use up (resources or reserves) completely. Expel (gas or steam) from or into a particular place. Waste gases or air expelled from an engine, turbine, or other machine in the course of its operation.
    exhibitPublicly display (a work of art or item of interest) in an art gallery or museum or at a trade fair. Manifest or deliberately display (a quality or a type of behavior)An object or collection of objects on public display in an art gallery or museum or at a trade fair.
    exileThe state of being barred from one’s native country, typically for political or punitive reasons. Expel and bar (someone) from their native country, typically for political or punitive reasons.
    exilesThe state of being barred from one’s native country, typically for political or punitive reasons. Expel and bar (someone) from their native country, typically for political or punitive reasons.
    exineThe decay-resistant outer coating of a pollen grain or spore. It typically bears a highly characteristic surface pattern that is used in palynology.
    exinesThe decay-resistant outer coating of a pollen grain or spore. It typically bears a highly characteristic surface pattern that is used in palynology.
    exitA way out, especially of a public building, room, or passenger vehicle. An act of going out of or leaving a place. Go out of or leave a place.
    exitsA way out, especially of a public building, room, or passenger vehicle. An act of going out of or leaving a place. Go out of or leave a place.
    exocarpThe outer layer of the pericarp of a fruit.
    exodusA mass departure of people, especially emigrants. The second book of the Bible, which recounts the departure of the Israelites from slavery in Egypt, their journey across the Red Sea and through the wilderness led by Moses, and the giving of the Ten Commandments. The events have been variously dated by scholars between about 1580 and 1200 BC.
    exogamyAnthropology
    exonA segment of a DNA or RNA molecule containing information coding for a protein or peptide sequence. Each of the four officers acting as commanders of the Yeomen of the Guard.
    exonsA segment of a DNA or RNA molecule containing information coding for a protein or peptide sequence. Each of the four officers acting as commanders of the Yeomen of the Guard.
    exonymA name for a place or group of people that is only used outside that place or group.
    exoticOriginating in or characteristic of a distant foreign country. An exotic plant or animal.
    exoticsOriginating in or characteristic of a distant foreign country. An exotic plant or animal.
    expanseAn area of something, typically land or sea, presenting a wide continuous surface.
    expenseThe cost required for something; the money spent on something. Offset (an item of expenditure) as an expense against taxable income.
    expertA person who has a comprehensive and authoritative knowledge of or skill in a particular area. Having or involving authoritative knowledge.
    expertsA person who has a comprehensive and authoritative knowledge of or skill in a particular area. Having or involving authoritative knowledge.
    expiryBritish, Canadian
    explantTransfer (living cells, tissues, or organs) from animals or plants to a nutrient medium. A cell, organ, or piece of tissue which has been transferred from animals or plants to a nutrient medium.
    exploitMake full use of and derive benefit from (a resource)A bold or daring feat. A software tool designed to take advantage of a flaw in a computer system, typically for malicious purposes such as installing malware.
    expoA large exhibition.
    exportSend (goods or services) to another country for sale. A commodity, article, or service sold abroad.
    exportsSend (goods or services) to another country for sale. A commodity, article, or service sold abroad.
    exposA large exhibition.
    exposeMake (something) visible by uncovering it. Reveal the true, objectionable nature of (someone or something)Subject (photographic film) to light when operating a camera. A report of the facts about something, especially a journalistic report that reveals something scandalous.
    exposesMake (something) visible by uncovering it. Reveal the true, objectionable nature of (someone or something)Subject (photographic film) to light when operating a camera. A report of the facts about something, especially a journalistic report that reveals something scandalous.
    expressConvey (a thought or feeling) in words or by gestures and conduct. Squeeze out (liquid or air)Genetics Operating at high speed. By express train or delivery service. An express train or other vehicle of public transportation. An overnight or rapid delivery service. An express rifle. Send by express delivery or messenger. Definitely stated, not merely implied.
    extentThe area covered by something.
    extentsThe area covered by something.
    externNorth American (in a strictly enclosed order of nuns) a sister who does not live exclusively within the enclosure and goes on outside errands. Banish (someone considered politically undesirable) from a region or district.
    externsNorth American (in a strictly enclosed order of nuns) a sister who does not live exclusively within the enclosure and goes on outside errands. Banish (someone considered politically undesirable) from a region or district.
    extraAdded to an existing or usual amount or number; additional. informal as submodifierIn addition. An item in addition to what is usual or strictly necessary.
    extractRemove or take out, especially by effort or force. A short passage taken from a piece of writing, music, or film. A preparation containing the active ingredient of a substance in concentrated form.
    extrasAdded to an existing or usual amount or number; additional. informal as submodifierIn addition. An item in addition to what is usual or strictly necessary.
    extremeReaching a high or the highest degree; very great. attributiveEither of two abstract things that are as different from each other as possible. Logic
    exudateMedicine Botany Entomology
    exurbA district outside a city, especially a prosperous area beyond the suburbs.
    exurbiaThe exurbs collectively; the region beyond the suburbs.
    exurbsA district outside a city, especially a prosperous area beyond the suburbs.
    exuviaeAn animal’s cast or sloughed skin, especially that of an insect larva.
    ExcaliburExmoorex-serviceman
    exacerbationexacerbationsexacter
    exactersexactionsexactitude
    exactitudesexactnessexactor
    exactorsexaggerationexaggerations
    exaggeratorexaggeratorsexaltation
    exaltationsexaltednessexaminant
    examinantsexaminationexaminations
    examineesexaminersexanimation
    exanthemexanthemaexanthemas
    exanthemsexarchateexarchates
    exasperationexasperationsexcavation
    excavationsexcavatorexcavators
    excellenceexcellencesexcellencies
    excellencyexcelsiorexcelsiors
    excentricexceptionexceptions
    excerptionexcerptionsexcerptor
    excerptorsexcessivenessexchangeability
    exchangerexchangersexchanges
    exchequerexchequersexcipient
    excipientsexcisemanexcisions
    excitabilityexcitablenessexcitants
    excitationexcitationsexcitedness
    excitementexcitementsexcitor
    excitorsexclaimingexclamation
    exclamationsexclaustrationexclaustrations
    exclosureexclosuresexcluder
    excludersexclusionexclusionism
    exclusionistexclusionistsexclusions
    exclusiveexclusivenessexclusives
    exclusivismexclusivistexclusivists
    exclusivityexcogitationexcogitations
    excogitatorexcommunicateexcommunicates
    excommunicationexcommunicationsexcommunicator
    excommunicatorsexcoriationexcoriations
    excrementexcrescenceexcrescences
    excrescenciesexcrescencyexcreter
    excretersexcretingexcretion
    excretionsexcruciationexcruciations
    excuditexculpationexculpations
    excursionexcursionistexcursionists
    excursionsexcursivenessexcursuses
    excusablenessexcuse-meexcuse-mes
    excuserexcusersexeat
    exeatsexecrablenessexecration
    execrationsexecutantexecutants
    executerexecutersexecuting
    executionexecutionerexecutioners
    executionsexecutiveexecutives
    executorsexecutorshipexecutorships
    executrixexecutrixesexegetics
    exemplarinessexemplarityexemplars
    exemplificationexemplificationsexemplifier
    exemplifiersexemplumexemption
    exemptionsexenterationexenterations
    exequaturexequatursexerciser
    exercisersexercisesexercising
    exercitationexercitationsexergues
    exertionsexfoliationexhalant
    exhalantsexhalationexhalations
    exhausterexhaustersexhaustibility
    exhaustionexhaustionsexhaustiveness
    exhedraexhibiterexhibiters
    exhibitionexhibitionerexhibitioners
    exhibitionismexhibitionistexhibitionists
    exhibitionsexhibitorexhibitors
    exhibitsexhilarantexhilarants
    exhilarationexhilarationsexhilarator
    exhortationexhortationsexhorter
    exhortersexhumationexhumations
    exhumerexhumersexigencies
    exigencyexiguityexiguousness
    existenceexistencesexistent
    existentialismexistentialistexistentialists
    exitanceexobiologistexobiologists
    exobiologyexocarpsexocrine
    exodeexodermexodermis
    exodermisesexodermsexodes
    exodusesexoenzymeexogen
    exonerationexonerationsexonerator
    exoneratorsexonymsexophthalmos
    exoplasmexoplasmsexopodite
    exopoditesexorabilityexorbitance
    exorbitancesexorciserexorcisers
    exorcismexorcismsexorcist
    exorcistsexorcizerexorcizers
    exordiumexordiumsexoskeleton
    exoskeletonsexosmosisexosphere
    exospheresexosporeexospores
    exostosisexotericismexothermicity
    exoticismexoticismsexoticness
    exotoxinexotoxinsexpandability
    expanderexpandersexpanses
    expansibilityexpansionexpansionism
    expansionistexpansionistsexpansions
    expansivenessexpansivityexpatiation
    expatiationsexpatiatorexpatiators
    expatriateexpatriatesexpatriation
    expatriationsexpectanciesexpectancy
    expectantexpectantsexpectation
    expectationsexpecterexpecters
    expectorantexpectorantsexpectoration
    expectorationsexpectoratorexpectorators
    expedienceexpediencesexpediencies
    expediencyexpedientexpedients
    expeditationexpeditationsexpediter
    expeditersexpeditionexpeditions
    expeditiousnessexpeditorexpeditors
    expellantexpellantsexpellee
    expelleesexpellerexpellers
    expellingexpendabilityexpendable
    expendablesexpenderexpenders
    expendingexpenditureexpenditures
    expensesexpensivenessexperience
    experiencesexperientialismexperientialist
    experimentexperimentalismexperimentalist
    experimentationexperimenterexperimenters
    experimentsexpertiseexpertises
    expertnessexpiationexpiations
    expiatorexpiatorsexpiration
    expirationsexpiriesexplainer
    explainersexplanationexplanations
    explantationexplantationsexplants
    expletiveexpletivesexplication
    explicationsexplicatorexplicators
    explicitnessexploderexploders
    exploitationexploitationsexploiter
    exploitersexploitsexploration
    explorationsexplorerexplorers
    explosionexplosionsexplosive
    explosivenessexplosivesexponent
    exponentialexponentialsexponents
    exportationexportationsexporter
    exportersexportingexposal
    exposalsexposednessexposer
    exposersexpositionexpositions
    expositorexpositorsexpostulation
    expostulationsexpostulatorexpostulators
    exposureexposuresexpounder
    expoundersexpoundingexpressage
    expressagesexpressesexpression
    expressionismexpressionistexpressionists
    expressionsexpressivenessexpressivities
    expressivityexpressmanexpresso
    expresswayexpresswaysexpropriation
    expropriationsexpropriatorexpropriators
    expulsionexpulsionsexpunction
    expunctionsexpungerexpungers
    expungingexpurgationexpurgations
    expurgatorexpurgatorsexquisite
    exquisitenessexquisitesexsanguination
    exsanguinityexsectionexsections
    exsertionexsertionsexsiccation
    exsiccationsexsiccatorexsiccators
    extemporaneityextemporaneousnessextemporariness
    extemporisationextemporizationextendability
    extenderextendersextendibility
    extensibilityextensimeterextensimeters
    extensionextensionalismextensionality
    extensionsextensitiesextensity
    extensivenessextensometerextensometers
    extensorextensorsextenuation
    extenuationsextenuatorextenuators
    exteriorexteriorisationexteriorization
    exteriorsexterminationexterminations
    exterminatorexterminatorsexternal
    externalisationexternalismexternalist
    externalistsexternalitiesexternality
    externalizationexternalsexternes
    exteroceptorexteroceptorsexterritoriality
    extinctionextinctionsextine
    extinesextinguishantextinguishants
    extinguisherextinguishersextinguishing
    extinguishmentextinguishmentsextirpation
    extirpationsextirpatorextirpators
    extollerextollersextolment
    extolmentsextortionextortioner
    extortionersextortionistextortionists
    extortionsextractabilityextractant
    extractantsextractionextractions
    extractiveextractivesextractor
    extractorsextractsextradition
    extraditionsextradosextradoses
    extraneousnessextraordinarinessextrapolation
    extrapolationsextrapolatorextrapolators
    extrapositionextravaganceextravagances
    extravaganciesextravagancyextravaganza
    extravaganzasextravasateextravasates
    extravasationextravasationsextraversion
    extraversionsextravertextraverts
    extremenessextremesextremism
    extremistextremistsextremities
    extremityextricationextrications
    extroversionextroversionsextrovert
    extrovertsextruderextruders
    extrusionextrusionsexuberance
    exuberancesexudatesexudation
    exudationsexultationexultations
    exurbaniteexurbanitesexuviation
    exuviations

    59 Nouns Beginning With EY

    Eyetieitalian
    Eysenck(1916–97), German-born British psychologist; full name Hans Jürgen Eysenck. He was noted for his strong criticism of Freudian psychoanalysis and for his ideas concerning the assessment of intelligence and personality (published in Race, Intelligence, and Education, 1971).
    eyasA young hawk, especially (in falconry) an unfledged nestling taken from the nest for training.
    eyasesan unfledged bird
    eyeEach of a pair of globular organs in the head through which people and vertebrate animals see, the visible part typically appearing almond-shaped in animals with eyelids. A thing resembling an eye in appearance, shape, or relative position. The small hole in a needle through which the thread is passed. Look at or watch closely or with interest.
    eye-openerin singularNorth American
    eye-openersin singularNorth American
    eyeballThe round part of the eye of a vertebrate, within the eyelids and socket. In mammals it is typically a firm, mobile, spherical structure enclosed by the sclera and the cornea. Look or stare at closely.
    eyeballsThe round part of the eye of a vertebrate, within the eyelids and socket. In mammals it is typically a firm, mobile, spherical structure enclosed by the sclera and the cornea. Look or stare at closely.
    eyeboltA bolt or bar with an eye at the end for attaching a hook or ring to.
    eyeboltsA bolt or bar with an eye at the end for attaching a hook or ring to.
    eyebrightA small plant of the figwort family with flowers resembling snapdragons. Found in dry fields and along roadsides, it was formerly used as a remedy for eye problems.
    eyebrightsA small plant of the figwort family with flowers resembling snapdragons. Found in dry fields and along roadsides, it was formerly used as a remedy for eye problems.
    eyebrowThe strip of hair growing on the ridge above a person’s eye socket.
    eyebrowsThe strip of hair growing on the ridge above a person’s eye socket.
    eyecupA piece of an optical device such as a microscope, camera, or pair of binoculars which is contoured to provide a comfortable rest against the user’s eye. A small container used for applying cleansing solutions to the eye.
    eyecupsA piece of an optical device such as a microscope, camera, or pair of binoculars which is contoured to provide a comfortable rest against the user’s eye. A small container used for applying cleansing solutions to the eye.
    eyefulinformal
    eyefulsinformal
    eyeglassA single lens for correcting or assisting defective eyesight, especially a monocle.
    eyeglassesA single lens for correcting or assisting defective eyesight, especially a monocle.
    eyelashEach of the short curved hairs growing on the edges of the eyelids, serving to protect the eyes from dust particles.
    eyelashesEach of the short curved hairs growing on the edges of the eyelids, serving to protect the eyes from dust particles.
    eyeletA small round hole in leather or cloth for threading a lace, string, or rope through. Make eyelets in (fabric)
    eyeleteerA tool or machine for making eyelets or similar small holes.
    eyeleteersA tool or machine for making eyelets or similar small holes.
    eyeletsA small round hole in leather or cloth for threading a lace, string, or rope through. Make eyelets in (fabric)
    eyelidEach of the upper and lower folds of skin which cover the eye when closed.
    eyelidsEach of the upper and lower folds of skin which cover the eye when closed.
    eyelinerA cosmetic applied as a line around the eyes to make them appear larger or more noticeable.
    eyelinersA cosmetic applied as a line around the eyes to make them appear larger or more noticeable.
    eyepatchA patch worn to protect an injured eye.
    eyepatchesA patch worn to protect an injured eye.
    eyesEach of a pair of globular organs in the head through which people and vertebrate animals see, the visible part typically appearing almond-shaped in animals with eyelids. A thing resembling an eye in appearance, shape, or relative position. The small hole in a needle through which the thread is passed. Look at or watch closely or with interest.
    eyeshadeA translucent visor used to protect the eyes from strong light.
    eyeshadesA translucent visor used to protect the eyes from strong light.
    eyesightA person’s ability to see.
    eyesoreA thing that is very ugly, especially a building that disfigures a landscape.
    eyesoresA thing that is very ugly, especially a building that disfigures a landscape.
    eyestalkA movable stalk that bears an eye near its tip, especially in crabs, shrimps, and related crustaceans, and in some mollusks.
    eyestalksA movable stalk that bears an eye near its tip, especially in crabs, shrimps, and related crustaceans, and in some mollusks.
    eyestrainweariness or a strained state of the eye
    eyestrainsweariness or a strained state of the eye
    eyraA reddish-brown form of the jaguarundi.
    eyrasA reddish-brown form of the jaguarundi.
    eyreA circuit court held in medieval England by a judge (a justice in eyre) who rode from county to county for that purpose.
    eyresA circuit court held in medieval England by a judge (a justice in eyre) who rode from county to county for that purpose.
    eyrieA large nest of a bird of prey, especially an eagle, typically built high in a tree or on a cliff.
    Eyetieseyaleteyalets
    eyeblackeyehookeyehooks
    eyneeyoteyots
    eyrieseyry

    2 Nouns That Start With EZ

    EzekielA Hebrew prophet of the 6th century BC who prophesied the forthcoming destruction of Jerusalem and the Jewish nation and inspired hope for the future well-being of a restored state.
    Ezraa Hebrew priest, scribe, and reformer of Judaism of the fifth century b. c. in Babylon and Jerusalem

    Conclusion

    Read:  3450+ Nouns That Start With G

    In conclusion, there are many different types of nouns that start with the letter E. These include eagles, eggs, and even emus! Each of these nouns has a different meaning and can be used in a variety of different contexts. Whether you’re looking for a noun to use in a sentence or you’re just curious about the different types of nouns out there, you’re sure to find something interesting on this list.

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