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75+ Fishes That Start With C

    Fishes That Start With C

    There are over 34,000 species of fish in the world, and about 1,200 of those species begin with the letter “C”. This article takes a closer look at some of the most interesting fishes that start with the letter “C”. The first fish on the list is the California sheephead, a fish that can change its appearance from bright red to dull brown.

    The next fish is the clownfish, made famous by the movie “Finding Nemo”. The clownfish is orange with white stripes, and lives among the poisonous tentacles of the sea anemone. The final fish is the coelacanth, a fish that was thought to be extinct for over 65 million years until it was discovered alive and well in the 20th century.

    Fishes That Start With The Letter C

    It’s always a fun challenge to try and name as many animals as possible that start with a certain letter of the alphabet. This time, we’re going to focus on animals that start with the letter C. For this article, we’ll be focusing on fish specifically. Here are some different fish that start with the letter C.

    Carp

    The Carp is a freshwater fish that is native to Europe and Asia. It is a member of the Cyprinidae family, which also includes the minnows and the barbs. The Carp is a large fish, and can grow to be over four feet long and weigh over fifty pounds. The Carp is a popular game fish, and is also kept as a pet in many parts of the world.

    The Carp is a omnivorous fish, and will eat just about anything. They are especially fond of aquatic plants, and will uproot whole plants in search of food. Carp are also known to eat other fish, small mammals, and even birds. Carp have a very large mouth, and are capable of swallowing prey that is much larger than their own head.

    Carp

    Carp are a very old species of fish, and are believed to have first evolved over sixty million years ago. Carp are found in nearly every country in the world, and are one of the most widely distributed fish species. Carp are popular as a food fish, and are raised in fish farms in many parts of the world.
    The Carp is a hardy fish, and can live in a wide.

    Catfish

    Catfish are a diverse group of ray-finned fish. Named for their prominent barbels, which resemble cat whiskers, catfish range in size and behavior from the three largest species, the Mekong giant catfish from Southeast Asia, the wels catfish of Eurasia and the piraíba of South America, to detritivores (species that eat dead material originating from higher on the food chain) and even to a tiny parasitic species commonly called the candiru, Candirú urophthalmus.

    Catfish are found in freshwater environments, though some species have been adapted to live in brackish or salt water. Representatives of at least eight families are found in fresh water, with most of the diversity in Africa. Catfish are most diverse in tropical South America, Asia and Africa, with one family native to North America and one family in Europe. More than half of all catfish species live in the Americas.

    Catfish

    Catfish have inhabited all continents at one time or another. Catfish are most diverse in tropical South America, Asia and Africa, with one family in North America (the Ictaluridae) and one family in Europe (the Siluridae).

    Cod

    Cod is the common name for the demersal fish genus Gadus, belonging to the family Gadidae. Cod is also used as part of the common name for a number of other fish species, and some species suggested to belong to the Gadus are instead placed in other genera.

    Most cod are relatively small fish. The largest member of the Gadus genus is Gadus morhua, which reaches a length of 180 cm (6 ft) and a weight of up to 96 kg (212 lb). Cod are commercially important fish, and are highly sought-after as a food fish. They are easy to catch because of their tendency to swim in large schools near the sea floor. Their diet consists primarily of small fish, squid, and crustaceans.

    Cod

    Cod are an important source of food for humans. They are harvested by commercial fisheries and are also popular as a recreational fish. Cod are heavily exploited, with their populations facing significant declines.

    The Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is a species of cod from the family Gadidae. It is found in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, from Iceland and Norway south to Morocco, and in the northwest Atlantic Ocean, from Newfoundland to the Gulf of Saint.

    Clownfish

    Clownfish or anemonefish are fishes from the subfamily Amphiprioninae in the family Pomacentridae. Thirty species are recognized: one in the genus Premnas, while the remaining are in the genus Amphiprion. In the wild, they all form symbiotic relationships with sea anemones. Depending on species, clownfish are overall yellow, orange, or a reddish or blackish color, and many show white bars or patches. The largest can reach a length of 18 centimetres (7.1 in), while the smallest barely achieve 10 centimetres (3.9 in).

    Clownfish

    Clownfish live at the bottom of the ocean in warm waters near the coral reefs. They are omnivorous, eating small crustaceans, plankton, and leftovers from the anemone’s meals. Clownfish are protandrous hermaphrodites, meaning that they are born male and change sex to female. The largest and most dominant fish in a group becomes a female. If the female dies, one of the largest and most dominant males will change sex and become a female. Clownfish are among the most popular aquarium fish.

    Read:  60+ Fishes That Start With G

    California Flyingfish

    California Flyingfish

    The California flyingfish, with its elongated fins that resemble wings, is a real-life superhero of the Pacific Ocean. These silvery fish, measuring up to 15 inches, can launch themselves out of the water and glide through the air for up to 300 feet! Their pectoral fins act as wings, while their enlarged pelvic fins serve as stabilizers during flight. Imagine a fish doing a high-flying stunt across the waves – that’s the California flyingfish!

    But why do these fish take to the skies? Flyingfish use their aerial abilities to escape predators like dolphins and tuna. By leaping out of the water, they become momentarily airborne, confusing their pursuers and buying themselves precious time to disappear back into the depths. It’s an incredible adaptation that showcases the power of evolution in action.

    Next time you’re at the beach, keep an eye out for these amazing creatures. You might just witness a real-life fish take flight!

    Candlefish

    Candlefish

    The aptly named candlefish is a small, bioluminescent fish found in the cold waters off the coast of British Columbia, Canada. Measuring only about 5 inches, these fish pack a luminous punch. During their annual spawning season in late winter, millions of candlefish gather near the shore, creating a mesmerizing spectacle of light.

    Each candlefish has rows of light-emitting organs called photophores along its underside. These organs produce a soft, blue-green glow that illuminates the water like thousands of tiny candles. The purpose of this bioluminescence is still being studied, but it’s thought to attract predators to prey on the candlefish themselves, which in turn attracts larger predators like salmon, creating a feeding frenzy that benefits the entire marine ecosystem.

    The candlefish’s bioluminescence is a testament to the wonders of nature. It’s a reminder that even in the deep, dark ocean, there’s beauty and magic to be found.

    Cardinalfish

    Cardinalfish

    Cardinalfish are a vibrant and diverse group of fish found in tropical and subtropical waters around the world. With over 600 species, cardinalfish come in a dazzling array of colors, from fiery red and orange to electric blue and yellow. Some even have stripes, spots, or intricate patterns that make them look like living jewels.

    Most cardinalfish are small, ranging from just a few inches to about 6 inches in length. They often live in coral reefs or rocky areas, where they find food and shelter among the nooks and crannies. Cardinalfish are carnivores, feeding on tiny crustaceans, worms, and plankton. They have large mouths and sharp teeth for grabbing their prey.

    Despite their small size, cardinalfish play an important role in the marine ecosystem. They help to control the populations of small invertebrates and serve as a food source for larger fish. Their vibrant colors also make them popular ornamental fish, kept in aquariums around the world.

    Carpetshark

    Carpetshark

    Carpetsharks are aptly named for their incredible ability to blend into the seafloor. These small, bottom-dwelling sharks, measuring around 4 feet on average, are found in tropical coral reefs and shallow coastal waters around the world. Their flattened bodies and mottled patterns, often resembling dead coral or seaweed, make them virtually invisible to predators and unsuspecting prey.

    Unlike most sharks, carpetsharks have no dorsal fin on their back, further streamlining their camouflage profile. Their mouths are located on the underside of their heads, perfect for ambushing unsuspecting crustaceans and small fish that scuttle across the seabed. Despite their unassuming appearance, carpetsharks are equipped with sharp teeth and powerful jaws, making them efficient predators.

    These fascinating fish play a vital role in the marine ecosystem. Their effective camouflage helps maintain healthy populations of invertebrates, preventing them from becoming overgrazed. Additionally, carpetsharks serve as a food source for larger predators like sea turtles and rays, contributing to the delicate balance of the coral reef food web.

    Cat Shark

    Cat Shark

    Cat sharks are not your typical fearsome predators. These adorable sharks, measuring around 3 feet on average, are named for their large, luminous eyes that resemble those of a cat. With their rounded heads, slender bodies, and flattened snouts, they exude a playful charm that belies their carnivorous nature.

    Found in tropical and temperate waters around the world, cat sharks are primarily nocturnal hunters. Their keen eyesight helps them track down small fish, squid, and crustaceans in the darkness. They use their flexible bodies and powerful tails to maneuver through coral reefs and rocky crevices, often employing a “sucking” technique to capture prey.

    Unlike most sharks, cat sharks lack the barb on their tails that can deliver a sting. Instead, they rely on their agility and camouflage to avoid predators. Their coloration often blends in with the surrounding environment, making them difficult to spot for larger sharks and other marine threats.

    These curious and gentle sharks are popular attractions in aquariums around the world. Their playful personalities and unique appearance make them fascinating ambassadors for ocean conservation, reminding us of the diversity and beauty of the underwater world.

    Cavefish

    Cavefish

    Cavefish are nature’s pioneers, venturing into the perpetual darkness of underwater caves where sunlight never reaches. These remarkable fish, ranging in size from a few inches to over a foot, have adapted to their unique environment in extraordinary ways.

    The most striking adaptation is the loss of sight. Cavefish have no eyes, or greatly reduced eyes, as they are no longer necessary in the complete darkness. Instead, they rely on other senses, like touch and taste, to navigate and find food. Their bodies are often pale or translucent, reflecting the absence of pigment needed for coloration.

    Despite the challenges of living in darkness, cavefish have thriving populations in underground ecosystems around the world. They have developed unique behaviors for finding food, such as using barbels on their snouts to detect prey vibrations in the water. Some species even emit bioluminescence, creating their own light for communication and hunting.

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    Cavefish are not only fascinating creatures, but they also hold scientific significance. Their adaptation to life in the dark reveals remarkable evolutionary processes and provides insights into understanding human senses and diseases related to vision. Studying these unique fish helps us appreciate the diversity of life and the incredible ways organisms adapt to their environments.

    Channel Catfish

    Channel Catfish

    The channel catfish, with its distinctive barbels and whisker-like appendages, is a popular freshwater fish found in rivers, lakes, and ponds across North America. These bottom-dwelling fish, measuring up to 3 feet on average, play an important role in the aquatic ecosystem and are prized by anglers for their delicious taste and fighting spirit.

    Channel catfish have remarkable sensory abilities. Their barbels, located around their mouth and nose, are packed with taste and touch receptors, helping them navigate in murky waters and locate food like worms, insects, and small fish. They also have excellent hearing, allowing them to detect vibrations and sounds in their environment.

    These whiskered wonders are essential members of the freshwater food chain. They consume large amounts of aquatic insects and invertebrates, helping to control their populations and maintain a healthy balance in the ecosystem. Channel catfish also serve as a food source for larger predators like bass, turtles, and otters, contributing to the web of life in freshwater habitats.

    Celebes Rainbowfish

    Celebes Rainbowfish

    Imagine a fish painted with the shimmering colors of a rainbow – that’s the Celebes rainbowfish! Found in the freshwater lakes and rivers of Sulawesi, Indonesia, these dazzling fish are a sight to behold. With elongated bodies and fins adorned in vibrant hues of blue, green, orange, and red, they glide through the water like living jewels.

    Male Celebes rainbowfish are particularly showy, displaying their vibrant colors to attract mates during breeding season. They perform elaborate courtship dances, flaring their fins and shimmering their scales like underwater discos. Females, though less colorful, are essential in maintaining the delicate balance of the species.

    These rainbowfish are more than just pretty faces; they play a vital role in the health of their ecosystem. They feed on algae and detritus, helping to keep the water clean and clear. They are also preyed upon by larger fish, providing an important food source for other species. Unfortunately, due to habitat loss and pollution, some Celebes rainbowfish species are threatened, making conservation efforts crucial to preserving their iridescent beauty.

    Cherubfish

    Cherubfish

    With their plump bodies, wide-set eyes, and perpetual pout, cherubfish are the adorable angels of the coral reef. These small, colorful fish, ranging from a few inches to a foot in length, inhabit tropical coral reefs in the Indo-Pacific region, adding a touch of whimsy to the underwater world.

    Despite their angelic appearance, cherubfish are actually fierce predators. They have small, pointed teeth and powerful jaws, ideal for crushing the hard shells of their prey, primarily crabs and shrimp. They use their keen eyesight and sharp senses to locate their prey, often hiding in crevices and ambushing them with lightning-fast strikes.

    But don’t let their predatory ways fool you; cherubfish are still quite charming. Their gentle demeanor and playful movements make them popular inhabitants in aquariums around the world. They are relatively easy to care for and add a splash of color and personality to any saltwater tank.

    Cutlassfish

    Cutlassfish

    Imagine a fish shaped like a gleaming scimitar, slicing through the darkness of the ocean depths. That’s the cutlassfish, a mesmerizing predator with a long, slender body and a silver sheen that reflects moonlight like a liquid blade. These agile hunters, averaging around 3 feet in length, reign supreme in the mesopelagic zone, the dimly lit twilight zone between 660 and 3,300 feet below the surface.

    Cutlassfish boast impressive adaptations for their deep-sea lifestyle. Their large, upward-facing eyes excel at gathering faint light, allowing them to spot bioluminescent prey or the silhouettes of unsuspecting fish above. Their elongated bodies minimize drag as they dart through the water, and their powerful jaws are equipped with needle-like teeth perfect for spearing squid, crustaceans, and even other fish.

    One of the most fascinating aspects of cutlassfish is their bioluminescence. Some species have rows of light-emitting organs along their bellies, creating a mesmerizing blue-green glow. This “living lantern” serves multiple purposes: attracting prey, communicating with other cutlassfish, and even startling predators with a sudden flash of light. Cutlassfish are a testament to the remarkable diversity and adaptations found in the deep ocean, reminding us that there’s still so much to discover in the dark abyss.

    Crocodile Shark

    Crocodile Shark

    The crocodile shark is a living relic from the past, a prehistoric predator that has roamed the oceans for over 80 million years. With its elongated snout, rows of sharp teeth, and a powerful tail, it bears an uncanny resemblance to its namesake reptile. These fascinating fish, measuring up to 13 feet on average, inhabit the deep waters around Australia and New Zealand, preferring the cold, dark depths beyond the reach of sunlight.

    Despite their reptilian appearance, crocodile sharks are not closely related to crocodiles. They belong to the hexanchiform sharks, a lineage that diverged from other sharks over 200 million years ago. This makes them “living fossils,” providing scientists with valuable insights into the evolution of sharks and the ancient marine world.

    Crocodile sharks are ambush predators, using their sensitive snouts to detect the scent of prey like sea snails, squid, and even small fish. Their powerful jaws, lined with multiple rows of serrated teeth, can crush through hard shells with ease. They are solitary hunters, often lurking near the seafloor, waiting for the perfect opportunity to strike.

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    The crocodile shark’s existence reminds us of the deep time of the ocean, where ancient creatures still thrive in the darkness. It serves as a living link to the past, a reminder of the incredible diversity and resilience of life on Earth.

    Crestfish

    Crestfish

    Crestfish, adorned with vibrant crowns of colorful fins, are the royalty of the coral canyons. These small, reef-dwelling fish, typically ranging from 3 to 6 inches in length, inhabit the coral reefs of the Indo-Pacific region, adding a splash of color and personality to the underwater world. Their most striking feature is a crest of elongated dorsal fins, often tipped with vibrant hues of red, orange, and yellow, making them resemble miniature underwater monarchs.

    But beneath their regal appearance, crestfish are fierce competitors. They are territorial fish, defending their coral patch homes against rivals with elaborate fin displays and chases. Their diet consists primarily of zooplankton, which they filter from the water using specialized gill rakers. Some species even engage in a unique feeding behavior called “corallivory,” nibbling on the surface of coral polyps to obtain nutrients.

    Crestfish play a vital role in the health of the coral reef ecosystem. By feeding on zooplankton, they help control populations of small organisms that could otherwise harm the coral. They also serve as a food source for larger predators, maintaining the delicate balance of the reef food web. Their vibrant colors and playful behavior make them popular additions to saltwater aquariums, where they bring a touch of the coral reef’s magic into our homes.

    Cornetfish

    Cornetfish

    Cornetfish are elegant flutists of the coral reef, named for their elongated snouts shaped like musical cornets. These slender fish, averaging around 12 inches in length, glide through the vibrant underwater landscapes of the Indo-Pacific region, adding a touch of grace and melody to the marine world.

    Imagine a fish with a vibrant orange body, edged with black stripes and adorned with shimmering blue scales. That’s the exquisite beauty of the cornetfish. Their elongated dorsal fin flows like a banner behind them, adding to their regal appearance. But their most striking feature is, of course, their trumpet-like snout. This specialized mouth is not for playing music, but for precision hunting. They use their long snouts to suck up small crustaceans and zooplankton from crevices and coral branches, making them masters of targeted feeding.

    Cornetfish are social creatures, often found in small groups or loose shoals. They communicate with each other through body language and subtle fin movements, creating a mesmerizing choreography of color and movement on the reef. Some species even exhibit “cleaning symbiosis,” allowing small cleaner fish to remove parasites from their bodies, a mutually beneficial partnership that thrives in the vibrant reef ecosystem.

    Combfish

    Combfish

    Combfish, named for their rows of comb-like scales, are masters of disguise in the sandy shallows. These small, bottom-dwelling fish, typically under 6 inches in length, inhabit tropical and subtropical waters around the world, blending seamlessly with their surroundings to avoid predators and ambush unsuspecting prey.

    Their color variations are astonishing. Combfish can be shades of brown, beige, and yellow, often mimicking the texture and color of the sand and seaweed they hide amongst. Some species even have intricate patterns and mottled markings that further enhance their camouflage, making them virtually invisible to the untrained eye.

    But don’t underestimate their hunting skills. Combfish are ambush predators, using their keen eyesight and sensitive snouts to detect small crustaceans and worms burrowing in the sand. Their comb-like scales act as miniature shovels, helping them quickly excavate their prey with lightning-fast strikes. They are opportunistic feeders, sometimes even venturing into the open water to snatch plankton with their agile mouths.

    Combfish play a vital role in the marine ecosystem, keeping populations of small invertebrates in check and serving as a food source for larger predators. Their remarkable camouflage skills are a testament to the power of evolution and adaptation, showcasing the endless variety of strategies fish employ to survive and thrive in the underwater world.

    Coffinfish

    Coffinfish

    Coffinfish, aptly named for their boxy, angular bodies, are curious creatures of the deep ocean. These small, benthic fish, rarely exceeding 6 inches in length, inhabit the cold, dark waters around the world, from the Arctic to the Antarctic. Their unusual shape and solitary lifestyle make them fascinating oddities of the deep sea.

    Imagine a fish shaped like a perfect cube, its body encased in bony plates that resemble armor. That’s the captivating appearance of the coffinfish. They lack a swim bladder, relying on their fins and currents to navigate the dark depths. Their large, upward-facing eyes are adapted to dim light, allowing them to spot bioluminescent prey or the silhouettes of unsuspecting creatures above.

    Coffinfish are ambush predators, lying in wait on the seafloor or hiding within crevices. Their boxy shape helps them wedge themselves into tight spaces, offering perfect camouflage and a vantage point for launching surprise attacks. They use their powerful jaws and sharp teeth to grasp passing shrimp, worms, and small fish, making them efficient hunters in the resource-limited environment of the deep sea.

    The coffinfish’s unique shape and solitary lifestyle remain a subject of scientific study. Some researchers believe their boxy form offers hydrodynamic advantages, while others speculate it provides protection against predators. Regardless of the reason, these curious creatures of the deep add another layer of wonder and diversity to the vast and mysterious world of the ocean.

    78 Fishes Beginning With C

    California flyingfishCalifornia halibut
    Canary rockfishCandiru
    CandlefishCapelin
    CardinalfishCardinal tetra
    CarpCarpetshark
    CarpsuckerCatalufa
    CatfishCatla
    Cat sharkCavefish
    Celebes rainbowfishCentral mudminnow
    Chain pickerelChannel bass
    Channel catfishChar
    Cherry salmonChimaera
    Chinook salmonCherubfish
    ChubChubsucker
    Chum salmonCichlid
    CiscoClimbing catfish
    Climbing gouramiClimbing perch
    ClingfishClownfish
    Clown loachClown triggerfish
    CobblerCobia
    CodCodlet
    CodlingCoelacanth
    CoffinfishCoho salmon
    ColeyCollared carpetshark
    Collared dogfishColorado squawfish
    CombfishCombtail gourami
    Combtooth blennyCommon carp
    Common tunnyConger eel
    Convict blennyConvict cichlid
    Cookie-cutter sharkCoolie loach
    CornetfishCowfish
    Cownose rayCow shark
    CrappieCreek chub
    CrestfishCrevice kelpfish
    CroakerCrocodile icefish
    Crocodile sharkCrucian carp
    Cuckoo wrasseCusk
    Cusk-eelCutlassfish
    Cutthroat eelCutthroat trout

    Conclusion

    There are many different types of fish that begin with the letter “C”, including the clownfish, catfish, and channel catfish. Each of these fish has unique features and behaviors that make them interesting and enjoyable to watch. Whether you are a必利勁 beginner or an experienced fish keeper, adding a fish beginning with “C” to your aquarium is sure to add some excitement and variety.

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