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170+ Fishes That Start With S

    Fishes That Start With S

    This article is about fishes that begin with the letter S. The first paragraph gives a general overview of the article, including its purpose. The second paragraph provides a more specific introduction to the individual fishes featured in the article.

    This article discusses different fishes that all begin with the letter S. The different species of fish are the swordfish, salmon, sturgeon, and shark. All of these fish are unique in their own ways and can be found in different parts of the world.

    The swordfish is a large fish that can be found in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. It is a popular fish to eat and is known for its long, sharp sword-like nose. Salmon is another popular fish to eat and can be found in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. It is a pinkish color and is known for its oily flesh. Sturgeon is a large fish that can be found in freshwater lakes and rivers. It is known for its long body and for the caviar that is made from its eggs. Sharks are large, predatory fish that can be found in all oceans. They are known for their sharp teeth and for being one of the most feared animals in the world.

    Fishes That Start With The Letter S

    If you’re a fan of seafood, then you know there are a lot of different kinds of fish out there. And if you’re looking for a specific type of fish, you might be wondering: what are some fishes that start with “S”? Look no further – here are just a few examples.

    Sardines

    Sardines are small, oily fish that are found in the Mediterranean, the Atlantic, and the Pacific. They are an important food source for many people around the world.

    Sardines are high in protein and omega-3 fatty acids, which are important for heart health and brain development. They are also a good source of vitamin B12, iron, and calcium.

    Sardines

    Sardines are typically canned in oil or water. They can be eaten alone or used in recipes.

    Salmon

    Salmon is a type of fish that is found in the North Atlantic, the Pacific, and the Mediterranean. Salmon are an important food source for many people around the world.

    Salmon are high in protein and omega-3 fatty acids, which are important for heart health and brain development. They are also a good source of vitamin B12, iron, and calcium.

    Salmon

    Salmon can be cooked in a variety of ways, including baking, grilling, and smoking. They can be eaten alone or used in recipes.

    Swordfish

    Swordfish are a type of fish that are found in the Atlantic, the Pacific, and the Mediterranean. Swordfish are an important food source for many people around the world.

    Swordfish are high in protein and omega-3 fatty acids, which are important for heart health and brain development. They are also a good source of vitamin B12, iron, and calcium.

    Swordfish

    Swordfish can be cooked in a variety of ways, including baking, grilling, and smoking. They can be eaten alone or used in recipes.

    Shrimp

    Shrimp are a type of seafood that are found in the oceans around the world. Shrimp are an important food source for many people around the world.

    Shrimp are high in protein and omega-3 fatty acids, which are important for heart health and brain development. They are also a good source of vitamin B12, iron, and calcium.

    Shrimp

    Shrimp can be cooked in a variety of ways, including baking, grilling, and frying. They can be eaten alone or used in recipes.

    Sabertooth Fish

    Sabertooth Fish

    Unleashing the Inner Beast: Dive deep into the coral reefs of the Indo-Pacific, and you might encounter a fish with a prehistoric grin – the Sabertooth fish. True to its name, this ambush predator boasts long, needle-like canine teeth (up to 6 cm!) that protrude from its lower jaw. Imagine a toothy wolf lurking in the shadows, ready to strike!

    Living in the Twilight Zone: Measuring around 30 cm, the Sabertooth fish prefers the dimly lit waters between 50 and 150 meters depth. Their large, upward-facing eyes are perfectly adapted to this “twilight zone,” helping them spot unsuspecting prey like small fish and crustaceans. They excel at the element of surprise, lunging out from crevices and ambushing their victims with lightning speed.

    Flash of Color in the Deep: Don’t let the Sabertooth’s fearsome teeth fool you – they’re surprisingly colorful! Their bodies shimmer with shades of red, orange, and yellow, often adorned with intricate stripes or blotches. This vibrant camouflage helps them blend into the coral while lurking for prey. Next time you’re exploring the deep sea in documentaries or aquariums, keep an eye out for this captivating predator with a prehistoric bite!

    Sablefish

    Sablefish

    King of the Bottom Dwellers: Venture even deeper, to the dark, frigid waters around 600 meters, and you’ll find the undisputed ruler of the deep sea floor – the Sablefish. This sleek, black fish, aptly nicknamed the “butterfish,” can reach up to 2 meters in length and is a master of surviving in the crushing pressure and near-freezing temperatures of the abyss.

    A Delicacy from the Depths: Despite its fearsome nickname and habitat, the Sablefish is an incredibly valuable catch for fisheries. Its white, buttery flesh is prized for its delicate flavor and rich oil content, making it a sought-after delicacy in Japan and other parts of Asia. However, overfishing has threatened populations in recent years, highlighting the need for sustainable management of this deep-sea treasure.

    Adapting to the Darkness: Sablefish have evolved remarkable adaptations to thrive in the perpetual darkness of their environment. Their large, light-sensitive eyes can detect the faintest bioluminescent glow emitted by other deep-sea creatures, allowing them to hunt and navigate in the abyss. Additionally, their bodies produce a special type of antifreeze protein that prevents their blood from freezing in the near-freezing temperatures.

    Sacramento Blackfish

    Sacramento Blackfish

    Champions of the Sacramento: Move away from the salty oceans and journey to the freshwater realm of the Sacramento River in California. Here, you’ll find the Sacramento blackfish, a unique species crucial to the health of the river ecosystem. These bottom-dwelling fish, reaching up to 60 cm in length, play a vital role in cleaning the riverbed by munching on algae and detritus.

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    Indicators of River Health: The Sacramento blackfish is more than just a river vacuum cleaner. Their presence, or decline, serves as a vital indicator of the river’s health. Changes in water quality, pollution levels, and habitat degradation can significantly impact their populations, making them valuable sentinels for the overall well-being of the Sacramento River ecosystem.

    A Cultural Icon: The Sacramento blackfish holds cultural significance for the indigenous communities that have lived along the river for centuries. They feature in traditional stories and ceremonies, and their protection is intertwined with the cultural identity of these communities. By safeguarding the Sacramento blackfish, we not only preserve a vital species but also honor the cultural heritage of those who have stewarded the river for generations.

    Salamanderfish

    Salamanderfish

    A Walk from the Past: Imagine a fish with legs and lungs, able to slither from water to land. Sounds like something out of a fantasy movie, right? But these creatures were once common, and some even survived to this day – the salamanderfish! Discovered in 1939, these “living fossils” bridge the gap between amphibians and fish, offering a glimpse into our evolutionary past.

    Masters of Muddle: Found in the murky, oxygen-depleted waters of North American caves and springs, salamanderfish measure around 15 cm and have an eel-like appearance. But unlike true eels, they possess tiny pelvic fins that resemble legs, helping them navigate the muddy crevices of their underwater homes. When venturing onto land, they rely on their lungs and skin to breathe, making them truly amphibious.

    Blind but Brilliant Hunters: With their eyes reduced to light-sensitive dots, salamanderfish rely on other senses to find prey like small crustaceans and insect larvae. Their taste buds are highly sensitive, and they possess specialized organs used to detect electrical fields emitted by their prey. These “living fossils” remind us of the incredible diversity and adaptability of life on Earth, existing unchanged for millions of years in their unique and challenging environment.

    Salmon Shark

    Salmon Shark

    The Gentle Giant of the Deep: Forget Jaws – let’s meet the ocean’s gentle giant, the salmon shark! Reaching up to 10 meters in length, this behemoth dwarfs even the great white. But unlike its predatory cousin, the salmon shark feeds primarily on plankton, filtering millions of microscopic organisms through its enormous gills each day. Imagine a giant vacuum cleaner gliding through the depths, gracefully munching on its tiny underwater lunch.

    A Sunfish in Shark’s Clothing: Despite its fearsome name, the salmon shark is no hunter. Its elongated snout, small triangular teeth, and filter-feeding habits are more reminiscent of the ocean sunfish than its sharky relatives. They even share a love for sunbathing, warming themselves up near the ocean’s surface during the day. So next time you hear about a “shark,” remember not all fins and teeth belong to fearsome predators.

    Guardians of the Plankton: Salmon sharks play a crucial role in maintaining the health of marine ecosystems. By filtering large amounts of plankton, they control populations, preventing blooms that could disrupt the delicate balance of the ocean. These gentle giants remind us that not all giants are monsters, and some play vital roles in keeping our oceans thriving.

    Sand Eel

    Sand Eel

    Masters of Camouflage: Picture a shimmering ribbon weaving through the sandy shores, camouflaged perfectly against the seabed. That’s the sand eel, a master of disguise in the shallows. These small fish, rarely exceeding 20 cm, rely on their silvery scales and quick burrowing skills to stay hidden from predators like seabirds and larger fish. They spend most of their days half-buried in sand, only darting out to filter plankton from the water.

    Sand Dancers of the Sea: Sand eels don’t just blend in; they put on a show! When threatened, they perform synchronized leaps and dives, creating shimmering “bait balls” that confuse predators. This coordinated escape act is a marvel of natural selection, showing the power of collective action in the face of danger.

    Food Web Cornerstones: Despite their small size, sand eels play a critical role in the marine food web. They serve as a vital food source for numerous fish, seabirds, and marine mammals, including whales and dolphins. Their abundance provides the energy that flows through the entire ecosystem, making them the unsung heroes of the coastal food chain.

    Sandfish

    Sandfish

    Living Jewels of the Beach: Imagine a fish smaller than your thumb, shimmering like a tiny jewel as it burrows through the sand. That’s the sandfish, a fascinating creature that thrives in the harsh, sun-drenched shores of the Indo-Pacific. Measuring a mere 5-12 cm, these miniature marvels are perfectly adapted to their sandy world.

    Masters of the Burrow: Sandfish boast elongated bodies and powerful pectoral fins, perfect for digging burrows up to 2 meters deep. Their scales are smooth and covered in a protective mucus, allowing them to slide effortlessly through the sand. These burrows serve as their homes, shelters from predators, and even nurseries for their young.

    Sand Castle Snackers: Don’t be fooled by their size; sandfish are fierce hunters. They use their sharp teeth and keen eyesight to ambush small crustaceans and worms that venture near their burrows. Their diet also includes tiny fish and plankton, making them vital contributors to the health of the coastal ecosystem.

    Sandfish Adaptations: These tiny fish are masters of survival in extreme environments. They can tolerate high temperatures and low oxygen levels, thanks to special adaptations in their gills and blood. They even have the ability to “hibernate” in their burrows during dry periods, waiting for the tide to return and bring them fresh water and food.

    Sand Tilefish

    Sand Tilefish

    Diamonds in the Rough: Dive into the twilight zone of the deep sea, and you might encounter a fish that glitters like a living jewel. The sand tilefish, with its vibrant orange and red scales, is a true beauty of the abyss. Measuring around 15-30 cm, these fish prefer the darkness and tranquility of depths between 100 and 500 meters.

    Builders of the Deep: Unlike their sand-loving namesake, sand tilefish don’t burrow. Instead, they create their own homes by piling up rocks and debris into mounds on the seafloor. These “tilefish mounds” can grow to be several meters tall and provide shelter for the fish and other deep-sea creatures.

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    Dinner on the Menu: Sand tilefish are omnivores, feasting on a variety of prey. They use their sharp teeth to crack open clams and mussels, and their flexible mouths allow them to suck up soft-bodied creatures like worms and shrimp. They even have specialized organs that help them detect bioluminescence, guiding them to food sources in the perpetual darkness of the deep.

    Guardians of the Deep: Sand tilefish play a crucial role in maintaining the health of the deep-sea ecosystem. Their mounds provide vital habitat for other species, and their feeding habits help control populations of invertebrates on the seafloor. These living jewels are not just beautiful; they are essential players in the intricate dance of life in the deep.

    Sandbar Shark

    Sandbar Shark

    Gentle Giants of the Shallows: Forget the fearsome great white; the shallows are home to a gentle giant – the sandbar shark. Reaching up to 3.5 meters in length, these majestic creatures are the largest sharks found in coastal waters. But unlike their predatory cousins, sandbar sharks are filter feeders, giants that munch on plankton and small fish through their enormous gills.

    Sun-Bathing Beauties: These graceful sharks are often seen basking in the shallows, soaking up the sun’s warmth. Their dorsal fin breaks the surface, making them easily recognizable to beachgoers. Don’t be alarmed by their size; sandbar sharks are quite shy and pose no threat to humans.

    Crucial Nursery Grounds: Shallow coastal waters are vital nursery grounds for young sandbar sharks. They find protection and abundant food in these sheltered areas, before venturing out into deeper waters as they mature. Protecting these shallow habitats is crucial for the survival of this gentle giant.

    Ocean Ambassadors: Sandbar sharks are not just fascinating creatures; they are also important ambassadors for ocean conservation. Their presence in coastal waters reminds us of the interconnectedness of our planet and the importance of protecting marine ecosystems. By learning about and appreciating these gentle giants, we can inspire future generations to become stewards of the ocean.

    Sawfish

    Sawfish

    Imagine a graceful fish with a long, saw-like blade protruding from its snout, gliding through the coral reefs. This isn’t something out of a fantasy movie; it’s the Sawfish, a majestic and ancient creature that has been around for over 100 million years. Measuring up to 7 meters in length and weighing over 300 kg, these gentle giants are the largest sawfish species remaining, playing a crucial role in maintaining the health of coral reef ecosystems.

    Sensing and Stunning Prey: The Sawfish’s blade, called a rostrum, isn’t just for show. Packed with thousands of tiny electroreceptors, it helps the fish sense hidden prey buried in the sand or hiding within crevices. With a powerful swing of its rostrum, the Sawfish can stun or even cut its prey before swallowing them whole. Their diet mainly consists of small fish, shrimp, and squid, making them important predators in the reef food chain.

    Vulnerable Giants: Sadly, Sawfish populations have been severely impacted by overfishing and habitat destruction. Their long rostrum makes them vulnerable to entanglement in fishing gear, and coastal development often disrupts their breeding grounds. Despite their fearsome appearance, Sawfish are gentle giants in need of our protection. Conservation efforts are underway to protect these ancient guardians of the reefs, ensuring their survival for future generations.

    Scabbard Fish

    Scabbard Fish

    Dive deep into the cold, dark waters of the ocean, and you might encounter a sleek, silver fish streaking through the abyss like a living bullet. This is the Scabbard fish, a master of speed and agility in the extreme depths. Reaching up to 2 meters in length, these streamlined predators are built for hunting in the perpetual darkness of the deep sea.

    Built for the Chase: Scabbard fish boast torpedo-shaped bodies with large tail fins, allowing them to reach speeds of up to 80 km/hour. Their large, upward-facing eyes are specially adapted to detect faint bioluminescent light emitted by other deep-sea creatures, helping them track their prey in the darkness. These fish also have retractable barbs on their jaws, perfect for spearing unsuspecting squid and fish on the go.

    Masters of Energy Conservation: Living in a nutrient-scarce environment requires clever adaptations. Scabbard fish conserve energy by maintaining a body temperature slightly above the surrounding water. They also have a special type of muscle that uses less oxygen, allowing them to sustain their high-speed chases in the depths. These fascinating adaptations make the Scabbard fish a true marvel of deep-sea evolution.

    Scorpionfish

    Scorpionfish

    Don’t let the name fool you; Scorpionfish are not just venomous hunters – they’re also masters of disguise. These colorful bottom-dwellers blend seamlessly into their coral reef homes, waiting for unsuspecting prey to come within striking distance. With over 300 known species, Scorpionfish exhibit an incredible variety of shapes, colors, and textures, each perfectly adapted to their specific environment.

    Camouflage Champions: Some Scorpionfish resemble rocks, sponges, or even seaweed, using their bumpy bodies and intricate patterns to disappear into their surroundings. Others mimic harmless creatures like shrimp or worms, luring curious prey closer before launching a surprise attack. Their sharp spines and potent venom ensure a quick and efficient meal.

    More Than Just Predators: Despite their fearsome reputation, Scorpionfish play a vital role in the health of coral reef ecosystems. By preying on smaller fish and invertebrates, they help control populations and maintain the delicate balance of the reef community. They also serve as indicators of reef health, as their presence or decline can reflect the overall well-being of the ecosystem.

    Sharksucker

    Sharksucker

    Meet the master of free rides – the Sharksucker! These small, oval-shaped fish, measuring around 30 cm, have mastered the art of attaching themselves to larger marine animals, most famously sharks. Imagine a living remora hitching a ride on a giant underwater bus! But unlike your typical freeloader, Sharksuckers provide valuable services to their hosts.

    Cleaning Crew on the Go: Sharksuckers act as mobile cleaning stations, diligently removing parasites and dead skin from their “hosts.” Their mouths are specially adapted with tiny hooks that help them cling to their ride, while their sharp teeth scrape away unwanted guests. This symbiotic relationship benefits both parties – the Sharksucker gets a steady food source and protection from predators, while the host gets a thorough spa treatment!

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    Hitchhiking Champions: Sharksuckers aren’t picky about their rides. They attach themselves to a variety of marine animals, including manta rays, whales, and even other sharks! They can even switch hosts mid-journey, demonstrating their impressive agility and adaptability. These tiny fish remind us that even in the vast ocean, cooperation and mutual benefit can thrive.

    Sheatfish

    Sheatfish

    Step into the freshwater realm and encounter the giants of the catfish family – the Sheatfish! These massive bottom-dwellers, reaching up to 3 meters in length, are found in rivers and lakes across Europe and Asia. Despite their intimidating size, Sheatfish are surprisingly gentle creatures, playing a crucial role in maintaining healthy freshwater ecosystems.

    Nighttime Hunters: Don’t let their docile demeanor fool you; Sheatfish are stealthy predators. They rely on their long whiskers and keen sense of smell to hunt for food at night, mainly targeting small fish, frogs, and invertebrates. Their large, wide mouths can even suck in unsuspecting prey, making them surprisingly efficient hunters despite their slow-moving habits.

    Indicators of River Health: The presence or decline of Sheatfish populations can tell us a lot about the health of a freshwater ecosystem. They are sensitive to pollution and habitat degradation, making them valuable indicators of environmental quality. Protecting Sheatfish not only means safeguarding these impressive giants but also ensuring the well-being of the entire freshwater community.

    Silver Carp

    Silver Carp

    Imagine a fish that can leap out of the water like a living missile, showering startled onlookers with sparkling droplets. That’s the Silver Carp, a fast-growing fish native to eastern Asia that has been introduced to other parts of the world, sometimes with unintended consequences.

    A Leaping Phenomenon: These silvery fish, reaching up to 1 meter in length, have powerful muscles that propel them out of the water at impressive heights – sometimes exceeding 3 meters! This acrobatic talent is a defense mechanism against predators, but it can also be a nuisance for boaters and anglers. Additionally, their voracious appetites can disrupt ecosystems by consuming large amounts of plankton.

    Managing the Invasion: Despite their challenges, Silver Carp have potential uses in aquaculture and biofuel production. Research is underway to control their populations and harness their resources sustainably. By learning about Silver Carp, we can understand the impact of invasive species and strive for responsible management of our waterways.

    Snipefish

    Snipefish

    Dive into the vibrant coral reefs of the Indo-Pacific, and you might encounter a fish with a remarkably long, needle-like snout protruding from its jaw. This isn’t Pinocchio underwater; it’s the Snipefish! These skilled ambush predators, measuring around 30 cm, excel at the element of surprise, lurking in crevices and darting out to capture unsuspecting prey with lightning speed.

    Masters of Camouflage: Beyond their striking snout, Snipefish boast vibrant colors and intricate patterns that help them blend seamlessly into their coral reef homes. Some species display bold stripes or blotches, while others mimic sponges or seaweed. This effective camouflage allows them to remain hidden from prey and potential predators alike.

    A Lightning Strike from the Shadows: When a curious fish or crustacean swims near their hiding place, Snipefish unleash their lightning-fast strike. Their elongated snouts act like spears, propelled by powerful jaw muscles to reach and snag their prey in a fraction of a second. Their needle-like teeth further ensure a secure grip, making them efficient hunters in the bustling coral reef ecosystem.

    Soldierfish

    Soldierfish

    Venture across tropical reefs, and you might be greeted by a flash of scarlet and orange. These are Soldierfish, aptly named for their vibrant scales and bold patterns that resemble military uniforms. More than just eye-catching, their colors serve as a warning to predators, showcasing their potent venom and reminding them that Soldierfish are not an easy target.

    Masters of Teamwork: Soldierfish often gather in large schools, creating a mesmerizing spectacle of crimson and gold against the azure backdrop. This behavior isn’t just for show; it offers protection against predators. The sheer number of individuals makes it more difficult for predators to single out a target, while the coordinated movements of the school can confuse and overwhelm attackers.

    Building Reef Communities: Beyond their striking presence, Soldierfish play a crucial role in maintaining healthy coral reefs. They feed on small invertebrates like plankton and shrimp, helping to control populations and prevent ecosystem imbalances. Their presence also attracts larger predators, bringing nutrients and creating a dynamic ecological web on the reef.

    Stonefish

    Stonefish

    Imagine a fish so perfectly disguised as a rock that you could step right on it without realizing it. That’s the Stonefish, a master of camouflage and an apex predator with a hidden venom potent enough to take down a human! But despite their fearsome reputation, Stonefish are vital members of the coral reef community, playing a crucial role in maintaining its ecological balance.

    Living Rocks: Stonefish take camouflage to a whole new level. Their warty skin, muted colors, and even algae growth mimic the surrounding rocks with exceptional accuracy. This enables them to ambush unsuspecting prey that venture too close, luring them within striking distance with their stillness.

    A Venomous Cocktail: Don’t be fooled by the Stonefish’s unassuming appearance. Each of their 13 dorsal spines houses a potent venom that can cause excruciating pain, paralysis, and even tissue death. While accidental encounters with humans are rare, it’s crucial to admire Stonefish from a safe distance and respect their powerful defenses.

    Silent Sentinels of the Reef: Despite their fearsome demeanor, Stonefish play a vital role in the health of coral reefs. They control populations of smaller fish and invertebrates, preventing imbalances that could disrupt the delicate reef ecosystem. By understanding and respecting these silent sentinels, we can ensure the continued thriving of these vibrant underwater communities.

    170 Fishes Beginning With S

    SábaloSabertooth
    Saber-toothed blennySabertooth fish
    SablefishSacramento blackfish
    Sacramento splittailSailfin silverside
    SailfishSalamanderfish
    SalmonSalmon shark
    Sandbar sharkSandburrower
    Sand dabSand diver
    Sand eelSandfish
    Sand gobySand knifefish
    Sand lanceSandperch
    SandrollerSand stargazer
    Sand tigerSand tilefish
    Sandbar sharkSarcastic fringehead
    SardineSargassum fish
    SaugerSaury
    SawfishSaw shark
    Sawtooth eelScabbard fish
    Scaly dragonfishScat
    Scissortail rasboraScorpionfish
    SculpinScup
    Sea bassSea bream
    Sea catfishSea chub
    Sea devilSea dragon
    Sea lampreySea raven
    Sea snailSea toad
    SeahorseSeamoth
    SearobinSevan trout
    Sergeant majorShad
    SharkSharksucker
    Sharpnose pufferSheatfish
    SheepsheadSheepshead minnow
    ShinerShortnose chimaera
    Shortnose suckerShovelnose sturgeon
    ShrimpfishSiamese fighting fish
    SillagoSilver carp
    Silver dollarSilver dory
    Silver hakeSilverside
    Silvertip tetraSind danio
    Sixgill raySixgill shark
    SkateSkilfish
    Skipjack tunaSlender mola
    Slender snipe eelSleeper
    Sleeper sharkSlickhead
    SlimeheadSlimy mackerel
    Slimy sculpinSlipmouth
    Smalleye squaretailSmalltooth sawfish
    SmeltSmelt-whiting
    Smooth dogfishSnailfish
    Snake eelSnakehead
    Snake mackerelSnapper
    Snipe eelSnipefish
    SnookSnubnose eel
    Snubnose parasitic eelSockeye salmon
    SoldierfishSole
    South American darterSouth American lungfish
    Southern Dolly VardenSouthern flounder
    Southern hakeSouthern sandfish
    Southern smeltSpadefish
    Spaghetti eelSpanish mackerel
    SpearfishSpeckled trout
    SpiderfishSpikefish
    SpinefootSpiny basslet
    Spiny dogfishSpiny dwarf catfish
    Spiny eelSpinyfin
    SplitfinSpookfish
    Spotted climbing perchSpotted danio
    Spottail pinfishSprat
    SpringfishSquarehead catfish
    SquaretailSquawfish
    SqueakerSquirrelfish
    Staghorn sculpinStargazer
    Starry flounderSteelhead
    SticklebackStingfish
    StingrayStonecat
    StonefishStoneroller minnow
    Stream catfishStriped bass
    Striped burrfishSturgeon
    SuckerSuckermouth armored catfish
    Summer flounderSundaland noodlefish
    SunfishSurf sardine
    SurfperchSurgeonfish
    SwallowerSwamp-eel
    SwampfishSweeper
    SwordfishSwordtail

    Conclusion

    There are many different types of fish that begin with the letter “S”. Some of these fish include the swordfish, salmon, and shark. Each of these fish has different characteristics and habitats. The swordfish is a large fish that has a long, sharp nose. It is found in warm ocean waters. Salmon is a type of fish that is found in both fresh and salt water. It is a popular fish to eat. Sharks are large, predatory fish that live in the ocean. They have sharp teeth and are dangerous to humans.

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